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Coefficients for Isc and Voc

  1. Apr 3, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I need to calculate the coefficients for open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current (Isc). I know that the higher temperature = lower Voc, higher Isc. I've done a bit of searching but I can't seem to find an equation or any theory about the coefficients though.

    2. Relevant equations
    I have one equation that was given:
    y(T) = y(25C) + (α/100)*(T-25C)

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I have an open circuit voltage of .51, .42,.46 and .3 at 26C,60C,90C and 120C, respectively.

    I also have short circuit current of .62, .66, .63 and .61 at the same temperatures.

    I was thinking of putting the data into a xy-scatterplot, then getting a trendline and finding the gradient. I'm not sure if the gradient would be what i'm looking for though...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 3, 2016 #2

    NascentOxygen

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    Staff: Mentor

    Is this in relation to a specific circuit or device?
     
  4. Apr 3, 2016 #3
    solar cell
     
  5. Apr 3, 2016 #4

    NascentOxygen

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    You are not going to fit a straight line to those figures. Are you able to remeasure?
     
  6. Apr 3, 2016 #5
    Do you know where I could find some literature on the coefficents? I can't seem to find anything...
     
  7. Apr 3, 2016 #6

    NascentOxygen

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    Have you tried a google search? e.g., temperature effect on photovoltaic cells
     
  8. Apr 3, 2016 #7
    Yes of course, but I can't find anything about the coefficients or calculating them.
     
  9. Apr 3, 2016 #8

    NascentOxygen

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    I would first plot the data to see whether it is going to be a good fit to a straight line.
     
  10. Apr 4, 2016 #9

    NascentOxygen

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