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Cold fusion

  1. Dec 11, 2004 #1
    Anyone trying this experiment?

    Put a solid cylindrical electrode (anode/cathode) inside a hollow cylindrical or tightly coiled electrode (cathode/ anode) so that there is only a minimal ‘potential space’ between the two electrodes, and immerse them in a suitable electrolyte solution. The electrodes are made of suitable materials; see if there is any fusion of ions inside the ‘potential space’ with release of energy.


    psah
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 11, 2004 #2

    Integral

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    What makes you think there would be?
     
  4. Dec 11, 2004 #3

    Tide

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    I didn't think science fiction was part of physicsforum's charter. :-)
     
  5. Dec 12, 2004 #4
    I'll work on that experiment once I finish my perpetual motion machine!
     
  6. Dec 12, 2004 #5

    Mk

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    A reply you may've wanted.

    Its not science fiction! Its real, you can prove it cause "they," the scientists said so! Everything scientists say is true! Like the internet... and... and.. the black and white tiny newspapers that say aliens are invading the Earth next Tuesday!

    But seriously, there are 2 cold fusion experimetns that I know of, one bubble fusion ( http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Bubble_fusion and http://www.rpi.edu/web/News/press_releases/2004/lahey.htm ), and one, that seems to be similar to yours.

    Some scientists have reproduced this experiment, but many who've tried haven't. Yet, it is common for a new phenomenon to be difficult to control, and to bring erratic results. For example attempts to repeat electrostatic experiments like those performed by Benjamin Franklin often failed due to a air humidity level that was too high. There are a lack of decay products. The average density of deuterium in the palladium rod seems to be insufficient to force pairs of nuclei close enough for fusion to occur according to mechanisms known to mainstream theories. The average distance is approximately 0.17 nanometers, a distance at which the attractive strong nuclear force cannot overcome the Coulomb repulsion. Actually, deuterium atoms are closer together in D2 gas molecules, which do not exhibit fusion.

    Cold fusion experiments are not regarded as legitamite material by physicists as you can see.

    Muon-catalyzed fusion is a reliable real form of cold fusion in though it does not produce close to enough energy to acheive breakeven energy.
     
  7. Dec 12, 2004 #6

    Tide

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    Mk,

    I'm not sure this is the right place in the forums to debate speculative science so I'll just borrow Carl Sagan's comment that "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" and add that the "evidence" in this case is quite remote from even qualifying as mildly compelling.
     
  8. Dec 12, 2004 #7

    Integral

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    To the contrary, no one with any credibility was EVER able to repeat the Pons and Fleischman experiments.
     
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