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Colligative Properties, Freezing Point Depression - Chemistry Lab

  1. Dec 5, 2011 #1
    Colligative Properties, Freezing Point Depression -- Chemistry Lab

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    In an attempt to hurry the experiment along a student did not completely dissolve the unknown nonelectrolyte. Will the freezing point depression of the solution be larger, unaffected, or smaller compared to if the compound was dissolved completely? Will the calculate molar mass be of the unknown be larger, unaffected, or smaller compared to if the compound was dissolved completely?

    A lazy student neglected to stir the contents of the test tube when attempting to freeze the solution of the unknown electrolyte. This allowed the solution to undergo supercooling. Will the freezing point depression of the solution be larger, unaffected, or smaller compared to a properly stirred solution?Will the calculated molar mass of the unknown be be larger, unaffected, or smaller compared to a properly stirred solution?

    The van't Hoff i factor for an aqueous solution of a weak monoportic acid was measured as 1.26. What is the percent ionization of this acid in the solution?
    2. Relevant equations
    ΔTfp= imK(fp)
    where ΔTfp is the change in the freezing point, i is the van't Hoff's factor (number of particles) and k is the freezing point depression of solute

    molar mass = (g solute/kg solvent)/ΔTfp/iKfp

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I am really not sure. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
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