Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Collision of two Black holes

  1. Jan 25, 2008 #1

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    For this to happen there must have been two stars that went super nova in close
    proximity, if so i find hard to think that a star would survive a very close companion going nova, so how do the two black holes get close enough to collide?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 25, 2008 #2

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Any two objects flying around in space could pass near each other and mutual gravity could alter their paths enough for them to collide.
     
  4. Jan 25, 2008 #3

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Thats a lot of could s how many black holes are there floating around.
     
  5. Jan 25, 2008 #4
    There's quite a few, centers of certain galaxies included.

    I'm sure this phenomenon that you talk about originally has happened at some point in the history of our universe, given the sheer number of stars that we know of that have died and black holes that we know of (not to mention the countless ones we don't know of), and my guess on this matter (and it is a guess, since we have no idea what happens to something when it hits the singularity of a black hole) is that the masses of the black holes combine to create a bigger one.
     
  6. Jan 26, 2008 #5

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    We are supposed to be living in an expanding universe so i guess the only chance for black hole merger is within local groups of galaxies, has a merged galaxy been observed that exhibit the behavior of having two massive black holes in it.
     
  7. Jan 28, 2008 #6

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

  8. Jan 28, 2008 #7
    Why not? I think another star, especially one that is big enough to make a black hole would have enough mass to hold itself together near a supernova.
     
  9. Jan 28, 2008 #8

    jimgraber

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Oj287

    Yes, at least one such is known. It's called OJ287.
    There was more info released at the recent AAS meeting.
    Here's a BBC link:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7181877.stm

    Best, Jim Graber
     
  10. Jan 28, 2008 #9

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    The BH is equal to 18 billion suns? has this BH been stoked since time began?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Collision of two Black holes
  1. Black hole collision (Replies: 13)

Loading...