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Color code of resistance

  1. Oct 17, 2015 #1
    What will be the color code of a zero Ohm resistance?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 17, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2015 #2

    ehild

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    Color codes are seen on resistor you can buy in a shop. Does anybody sell resistors of zero ohm resistance?
     
  4. Oct 17, 2015 #3

    phinds

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    It will be silver if it's an aluminum wire or copper-colored if it's a copper wire. :smile:

    Actually, I do seem to recall from another thread here that there IS such a thing as a zero-ohm resister but that just seems weird to me since all you need is a wire.
     
  5. Oct 17, 2015 #4

    Nidum

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  6. Oct 17, 2015 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    Not really such a daft idea, actually. The zero ohm link could be replaced by a link, when required, with finite resistance which would fit straight into position.
     
  7. Oct 17, 2015 #6
    Yup, very common in industry practice. One incorporates a number of "jumpers" into the circuit design. Removing or adding zero-ohm resistors at those points selects certain circuit behavior - for instance, choice of 5V or 3.3V power.
     
  8. Oct 17, 2015 #7

    phinds

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    Clever. So this way the PC board doesn't have to be modified, just the component insertion process. When I was an engineer trainee back in the '60s we just used wire jumpers, but then we were doing everything by hand but this is great for automation. I DO recall that the wire jumpers we used (they weren't just wire, they were a plastic form containing pins) were smaller than a resistor form factor and I remember using the same things on PC boards back in the early days of personal computers, but they didn't allow the option of putting an actual component in the same position which, as Sophie points out, these do.
     
  9. Oct 17, 2015 #8
    Also allows design of one board which can be "programmed" via jumpers to do a number of different things. Often used to disable/enable certain premium features.
     
  10. Oct 17, 2015 #9

    davenn

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    I use lots of these in commercial gear I build :smile:

    a section of one of my boards, note the zero Ohm links ...
    PA200001asm.jpg




    Dave
     
  11. Oct 17, 2015 #10

    A.T.

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  12. Oct 17, 2015 #11

    JBA

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    I would think that term would only apply to a superconductor jumper; but, I guess the correct tolerance band value deals with that issue.
     
  13. Oct 17, 2015 #12

    jbriggs444

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    How much is a relative error of plus or minus ten percent on a zero ohm resistor?
     
  14. Oct 17, 2015 #13

    JBA

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    A good point, I just let my mind slide through the fact that they are in percentages to the fact that the result is always a numerical value range. As a result, there justr seems to be no real excuse for this gross product mislabeling. (Just kidding)
    At this point I shall simply make my way back to the ME section where I belong and leave it the EE folks to deal with this dilemma.
     
  15. Oct 18, 2015 #14

    davenn

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    look at those ones on my circuit board pix .... do you see a tolerance band ? .... no


    Dave
     
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