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Colorblind and major college

  1. Jun 15, 2014 #1
    colorblind and physicist

    im colorblind but i have a plan go to a major in physics . its that a problem ? if i take a physics major ? and i want take a minor particle physics / quantum / nuclear physics / a material physics ? thanks
     
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  3. Jun 15, 2014 #2

    maajdl

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    Absolutely not.
    Quantum physics is about the nanoscopic world, where there is nothing like color.
    Using colors in course material is a luxury that is not necessary.
     
  4. Jun 16, 2014 #3
    thanks for the answer :)
     
  5. Jun 17, 2014 #4
    i want ask again like a nuclear physics its not a problem ?
     
  6. Jun 17, 2014 #5
    what subject I should not take? like physics? or chemistry? engineer? I've got a plan I want to get physical but still afraid to go into this field because I am partial - color blind .
     
  7. Jun 17, 2014 #6

    symbolipoint

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    Ask currently-employed engineers! If anyone would know about any disadvantages of colorblindness in engineering or physical sciences, working-engineers should know. Also, ask faculty members of physics and engineering departments of colleges.
     
  8. Jun 17, 2014 #7
    do you think this problem is color blind? if working in the field of physics?
     
  9. Jun 17, 2014 #8

    interhacker

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    My dad's cousin is color blind and he's a computer scientist. My dad is color blind and he's a surgeon. I think the only field where being color blind is a problem is the navy.
     
  10. Jun 17, 2014 #9
    uh what about art?
     
  11. Jun 17, 2014 #10

    micromass

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  12. Jun 17, 2014 #11
    so its not a problem right ?
     
  13. Jun 17, 2014 #12

    interhacker

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    Of course not, don't let something like this get in the way of your dreams and aspirations. Good luck.
     
  14. Jun 17, 2014 #13

    AlephZero

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    Read the link in Microsoft's post.

    "Color blind" is a generic term for a wide spectrum of conditions. At one end of the scale people can probably distinguish most colors "in real life" except that they perceive them differently from the majority. At the other end, they have no perception of "color" at all, only of brightness.

    Some occupations and industries require color blindness tests for safety reasons. This may not be directly connected to the "science" aspect of the job, but simply because hazardous materials are indicated by color codes. For example if you can't tell the red/green color difference between flammable and inflammable gas cylinders and pipelines in your working environment, you are a safety hazard not only to yourself but to everybody else. http://www.boconline.co.uk/en/sheq/...nder-colours/industrial-cylinder-colours.html

    In some industries hand tools etc are also color coded, to ensure similar looking tools are not mixed up and used in the wrong situation, where they could cause damage.

    Of course you should have aspirations, but make sure they are realistic.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  15. Jun 17, 2014 #14

    D H

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    I think you meant non-flammable rather than inflammable. Flammable and inflammable mean the exact same thing: Easily ignited. Sometimes in- as a prefix means "not" (e.g., infinite, inconsiderate) but other times (e.g., inflammable, invaluable), it means almost the opposite of "not". One could say that the in- prefix is rather inconveniently inconsistent with regard to meaning.
     
  16. Jun 17, 2014 #15
    I think the physics is not very use gas, industrial gas and very rarely need physicists, because I wanted a little more to the theoretical or practical. what if I majored in math problem?
     
  17. Jun 17, 2014 #16

    micromass

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    Math is no problem.
     
  18. Jun 17, 2014 #17
    physics ? im so love physics really
     
  19. Jun 17, 2014 #18

    AlephZero

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    True. :blushing:
     
  20. Jun 17, 2014 #19

    symbolipoint

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    stevxstev,

    micromass gave reference to an article about the use of color coding used in some engineering work. Some occupations require attention to colors and some do not. I suggested talking directly to currently-working engineers ( and now I suggest maybe other types of employed technology and scientific people).

    An occupation which uses color coding can be expected not to use certain color-blind people. An occupation whose analyses or products are color-dependant would also be a bad fit for certain or most color-blind people. Someone wanting to perform color matching work for paints, pigments, or dyestuffs needs to be color-vision capable, not color-blind. A microbiology technician or scientist needs to be able to use color for cell staining. A chemist might need to be able to see a clear color change difference for an analytical procedure, and if colorblindness makes that color change or difference seem unclear, then the color-blind chemist cannot do this work satisfactorily. On the other hand, someone doing spectrophotometric work might be fine, since he is mainly interested in measuring absorbance or transmission over either a range of wavelengths or at specific wavelengths; and does not need to use color vision. The instrument will give the needed information.
     
  21. Jun 19, 2014 #20
    the answer its ? cannot ? in physics ?
     
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