Commonly performed surgeries in America

  • #51
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3
Rads intrigues me for just that reason. The favorable call, which is very conducive to a family life, makes for an attractive specialty. Plus being a techie, it's a natural fit for me. I'm also considering rads onc, because of the opportunity to be involved in cancer treatments. There is the lack of patient interaction to consider. I'm not a Xenophobe, but I hear a lot of people saying that this is a distinct benefit of Rads. Plus the fact that rads are in such high demand atm, doesn't hurt either:wink:

I'm also considering a surgical specialty but it's a long shot given my advanced decrepid age. Also considering Psych, but I'm not too fond of the salaries vs the debt given the short amount of time I'll have to practice, but it's still a consideration. And of course I'll probably change my mind completely by 4th year, so it's all just speculation.

PS: Adreneline, what's your specialty?
 
  • #52
adrenaline
Science Advisor
100
3
Originally posted by Zantra
Rads intrigues me for just that reason. The favorable call, which is very conducive to a family life, makes for an attractive specialty. Plus being a techie, it's a natural fit for me. I'm also considering rads onc, because of the opportunity to be involved in cancer treatments. There is the lack of patient interaction to consider. I'm not a Xenophobe, but I hear a lot of people saying that this is a distinct benefit of Rads. Plus the fact that rads are in such high demand atm, doesn't hurt either:wink:

I'm also considering a surgical specialty but it's a long shot given my advanced decrepid age. Also considering Psych, but I'm not too fond of the salaries vs the debt given the short amount of time I'll have to practice, but it's still a consideration. And of course I'll probably change my mind completely by 4th year, so it's all just speculation.

PS: Adreneline, what's your specialty?
Internal Medicine, some office practice, but mostly deal with critical care patients in the ICU for family practioners, general surgeons, orthopedists etc. "intensivist" so to speak.

You may want to consider an interventional radiologist....has some kick ass angiographic surgical procedures (floating stents into renal arteries to fix renal artery stenosis etc.), and has some patient interaction but you do have to deal with a call schedule. (However, it is rare to have to come in the middle of the night..but when they do...it's serious business.)
 
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  • #53
OK, back to the topic,


Any surgeons here?
 
  • #54
Tsu
Gold Member
371
63
Originally posted by PrudensOptimus
OK, back to the topic,


Any surgeons here?
Not that I'm aware of. Why do you ask?
 
  • #55
Just looking for someone to share some insights with me, so I can decide which carrerr I really want.
 
  • #56
740
3
Originally posted by PrudensOptimus
OK, back to the topic,


Any surgeons here?
I would again refer you to www.studentdoctor.net as there are tons of surgeons as well as other doctors who visit there and could answer any questions you might have.

If you're considering surgery, you may want to give it some thought. Medicine in general is very demanding both mentally and physically, and surgery is the worst of them. It has the longest residency (at 7 years) that's in addition to your 4 years of med school and 4 years of college. So you'll be at least 33 or 34 years old before you're a full fledged surgeon. And the hours are brutal. I swear, I didn't even think there were that many hours in a week. They been changing it due the recently passed laws, but surgeons average at least 100 -120 hours per week over a 1 month period- which means you may work 120 hour one week, and only 60 the next. The rules have limited it to 80 hours averaged over a month, but that's only for med students. It goes right back to helllish after you graduate. And I won't even mention the call. In short, as any surg specialty will tell you, forget about a family. The divorce rate for surgeons is phenomenal, and that's for those who bother to attempt it. Not impossible, but extremely difficult. However, if it's your passion, you should pursue it. Just know what you're getting youreslf into.

The two possible exceptions to the rule are Plastic and ortho-still demanding, but not as bad as the other surg specialties
 
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