Communication problems

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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I've been having a hard time as of late, to communicate. I've always had problems with articulation and this seems to have worsen over the years and I speak too quickly. I think too much and too fast and I don't realise that I go so quickly.

It's not just "speech" problems, it's also in writing. I find hard to express myself when starting a new thread or posting or writing an e-mail.

It's not so much my language though, as I find that while my command of English is not excellent, it's at a reasonable level. In fact, when I'm writing (my own writing), I get things across much more easily.

My theory is that this is largely due to a loss of confidence and I'm not so certain what exactly caused this. Maybe most teenagers are insecure idiots.

How can I sort this out? Just by talking to people more? It doesn't seem to help because what I've described above persists.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Insecurity would definitely account for it. When something has happened to throw me off and doubt myself I find it hard to say anything definite until I recover, least a definite statement be challenged and I get thrown off again.




(Incidentally, your English is excellent.)
 
  • #3
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Insecurity would definitely account for it. When something has happened to throw me off and doubt myself I find it hard to say anything definite until I recover, least a definite statement be challenged and I get thrown off again.
Well, that's a doubt that's cleared. It's probably a combination of things.

Has anyone had any experience with seeing a speech therapist? I also feel like I'm making a huge strain when I speak - my throat feels weird.

(Incidentally, your English is excellent.)
Thank you but you give me too much credit. All I can do is put my limited vocabulary set to good use.
I wrote much better two years ago, back when I wanted to be a journalist/writer. Had my mind set on going to uni asap to read English Literature. I feel i can do both math and lit and somehow, going to uni for the former seems more reasonable. I feel like I wouldn't be doing myself justice if i didn't. Ah well...
 
  • #4
DoggerDan
If you're a teen, and hormones are involved, they can certainly affect a lot of things, including the brain i.e. language skills.
 
  • #5
Evo
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Has anyone had any experience with seeing a speech therapist? I also feel like I'm making a huge strain when I speak - my throat feels weird.
It could be anxiety about speaking in front of people, a very common fear. Some people join groups like Toastmasters to help them overcome their fear.
 
  • #6
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You remind me of my little brother. He is a smart kid but he as well has trouble articulating things. He can understand concepts in school but when I ask him to explain them to me he kind of fumbles around. Talking to people more is definitely a good way to deal with it. In social situations, I know my little brother can feel uncomfortable and he thinks he's not a very good story teller. Because of that, he's apprehensive to contribute because he's afraid that what he says wont be interesting.

I'm pretty sure everyone is interesting enough, and you'll be surprised at how often people are intrigued by what you think. I say don't worry about it too much, don't force anything, and just try to meet your goals as the opportunity arises.
 
  • #7
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It could be anxiety about speaking in front of people, a very common fear. Some people join groups like Toastmasters to help them overcome their fear.
Ironically enough, I've had experiences where I was speaking in front of lots of people and I actually speak better there (although I tend to speak quickly sometimes if I haven't prepared anything) than I do in social situations. I don't know, maybe I should go see a speech therapist and something good will come of it. :)

You remind me of my little brother. He is a smart kid but he as well has trouble articulating things. He can understand concepts in school but when I ask him to explain them to me he kind of fumbles around. Talking to people more is definitely a good way to deal with it. In social situations, I know my little brother can feel uncomfortable and he thinks he's not a very good story teller. Because of that, he's apprehensive to contribute because he's afraid that what he says wont be interesting.

I'm pretty sure everyone is interesting enough, and you'll be surprised at how often people are intrigued by what you think. I say don't worry about it too much, don't force anything, and just try to meet your goals as the opportunity arises.
Yes, it's a little like that. Thanks.

How old is your little brother?
 
  • #8
Evo
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Ironically enough, I've had experiences where I was speaking in front of lots of people and I actually speak better there (although I tend to speak quickly sometimes if I haven't prepared anything) than I do in social situations. I don't know, maybe I should go see a speech therapist and something good will come of it. :)
Speech therapists mainly work with people that have speech impediments, like stuttering, lisps, etc... It's not to give you confidence or teach you how to make speeches.

A speech therapist is a specialist with training in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of speech, voice, and language disorders who works with people, unable to make speech sounds or cannot make them clearly. They also work with people who stutter, have fluency and rhythm problems, inappropriate pitch, or harsh voice and speech quality problems. The most widespread and obvious speech disorder is stuttering, often caused by anxiety. The speech therapist sets up a program of speech exercises to reduce the disability, and if necessary, enlists the aid of a psychologist or psychiatrist. Other disorders may result from hearing loss, stroke, cerebral palsy, mental disability, or brain injury.
 
  • #9
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Thanks for pointing that out. :$

While I can have some rhythm problems, I doubt it's that bad. I'll try do some exercises of my own or just hit pause on my thoughts, then keep on talking. Now that I think of it, the problem is that when I'm saying something, I'm also thinking of other things.

Talking to people more should probably be enough.
 
  • #10
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"You remind me of my little brother. He is a smart kid but he as well has trouble articulating things. He can understand concepts in school but when I ask him to explain them to me he kind of fumbles around. Talking to people more is definitely a good way to deal with it. In social situations, I know my little brother can feel uncomfortable and he thinks he's not a very good story teller. Because of that, he's apprehensive to contribute because he's afraid that what he says wont be interesting."


Yes, it's a little like that. Thanks.

How old is your little brother?
He's 18. He just went away to university and I think he's enjoying himself a lot. I remember how much I changed when went moved out of my parents house so it'll be interesting to see the outcome.
 
  • #11
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Dude!! When you said "little", I thought, really "little". Maybe it's because my brother is much, much older than I am. Incidentally, I am eighteen as well. :)
 

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