Completely inelastic collisions

In summary, a completely inelastic collision is when two objects stick together after impact and move together as one mass, resulting in a loss of kinetic energy. The total momentum of the system is conserved, but the individual momenta of the objects may change. An example of this type of collision is when a baseball hits and sticks to a catcher's mitt. The kinetic energy is converted into other forms, such as heat or sound, and the coefficient of restitution is 0, meaning there is no bounce between the objects.
  • #1
marshall4
50
0
What is the equation for completely inelastic collisions?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Eqn 1: conservation of momentum.
Eqn 2: bodies stick together after collision.
 
  • #3


In completely inelastic collisions, the objects involved stick together after the collision and move as one mass. The equation for completely inelastic collisions is m1v1 + m2v2 = (m1 + m2)v', where m1 and m2 are the masses of the objects, v1 and v2 are their velocities before the collision, and v' is their common velocity after the collision. This equation is also known as the law of conservation of momentum, which states that the total momentum of a closed system will remain constant before and after a collision. In completely inelastic collisions, the kinetic energy is not conserved as some of it is converted into other forms of energy, such as heat and sound.
 

1. What is a completely inelastic collision?

A completely inelastic collision is a type of collision in which two objects stick together after impact and move together as one mass. This means that the kinetic energy before and after the collision is not conserved.

2. How is the momentum conserved in a completely inelastic collision?

In a completely inelastic collision, the total momentum of the system is conserved, meaning that the sum of the initial momenta of the objects is equal to the sum of the final momenta of the objects. However, the individual momenta of the objects may change.

3. What is an example of a completely inelastic collision?

One example of a completely inelastic collision is when a baseball hits and sticks to a catcher's mitt. The two objects (baseball and mitt) become one mass and move together after impact.

4. What happens to the kinetic energy in a completely inelastic collision?

In a completely inelastic collision, some or all of the kinetic energy is converted into other forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or deformation of the objects involved. This means that the total kinetic energy before the collision is not equal to the total kinetic energy after the collision.

5. How does the coefficient of restitution affect a completely inelastic collision?

The coefficient of restitution, which measures the elasticity of a collision, is 0 for a completely inelastic collision. This means that the objects involved in the collision do not bounce off each other and instead stick together after impact.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
47
Views
761
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
456
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
25
Views
827
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
993
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top