Complicated conversion

  • Thread starter Newpenny
  • Start date
  • #1
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Hi guys and girls :)

I'm trying to answer the following question: you are trying to generate a number of watts of energy using neodymium magnets. Let's say you are looking to reach 1000watts, so that you could have 10 light bulbs of 100wats each working. The magnets have some characteristics, like: strength (in kg), diam+height (in mm), energy product (in MGOe), and so on.
So, the question would be: how many magnets of a particular type does one need to generate enough power to light 10 light bulbs of 100wats each (so 1 kW)? Also, vice-versa, if one has 30 magnets let's say, how many Watts can you generate?

To make this easier, let's consider an example. One magnet has the following properties:
1. Residual magnetism (Br) has 10800-11200 Gauss or 1.08-1.12 Tesla;
2. Coercive field strength is:
2.1: bHc ... kOe (9.8-10.5), kA/m (780-836);
2.2: iHc... kOe (>=12); kA/m >=955;
3. Energy product (BxH)max: MGOe 28-30; kJ/m3: 223-239.
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
russ_watters
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Welcome to PF!

Do you mean you want to build your own electric generator? The generators used commercially to make electric power don't utilize permanent magnets.
 
  • #3
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i'm just looking to know how to convert all those cuties into Watts and vice-versa.
 
  • #4
russ_watters
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I'm sorry, but there is no direct relationship, so no such conversion.
 

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