Compressing air

  • Thread starter Batata
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  • #1
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Hi! I'm a biologist so be easy on me:)

Say I had a one liter glass flask filled with air and I had a 100 psi air compressor attached to it. (I don't want to suck air out but blow more inside!) How would the air in this flask react - according to the law of ideal gas the temperature of the air should start rising, but would I be able to increase the pressure in the flask as well? How much would I be able to raise the psi in the flask?

Thanks!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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i think if you had a 100PSI compressor, you could raise the pressure by 100PSI.
the volume would remain the same, so T would go up by the same factor.
100PSI is 14 times atmospheric pressure, so the temperature would increase by a factor of 14.

but i'm not 100% sure. hopefully someone else can either confirm i'm correct, or let you know what i did wrong.
 
  • #3
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dnp33
I'm sorry you are wrong, you seem to be applying Boyles law P1*V1/T1=P2*V2/T2 but this only works for a fixed mass of gas. The temperature of the gas in the flask in this instance would be about the same as the outlet temperature of the air compressor, which would depend on a huge number of factors.
 
  • #4
40
1
ah i see.
thank you for the correction, i seem to have missed the fact that there was obviously air being pushed into the flask.
 

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