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Compressing CO2

  1. Nov 17, 2012 #1
    Is there a way to build a rig so that I could compress CO2 gas to apressure of roughly 7MPa?

    I am building a CO2 Thermosyphone and need high pressure CO2 in order to get convection to occur.

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 18, 2012 #2
    At 70b it liquefies at 300K.
    http://encyclopedia.airliquide.com/images_encyclopedie/VaporPressureGraph/Carbon_dioxide_Vapor_Pressure.GIF [Broken]
    Are you pulling our leg?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  4. Nov 18, 2012 #3

    Q_Goest

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    If you only need a relatively small amount, high pressure cylinders would be the way to go. If you're an industrial user, purchasing it as a liquid and maintaining it in a refrigerated liquid storage tank is common. The liquid can be pumped by a single stage reciprocating machine.

    Talk to your industrial gas supplier to see what's best for you.
     
  5. Nov 18, 2012 #4
    Exactly high pressure will cause co2 to liquefy thus at roughly 31 degrees it will change state and evaporate.

    I am a student and I am building this as part of my degree project. We do not need much. We have a very limited budget. I haven't had any experience in doing this so I'm basically learning from scratch.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  6. Nov 22, 2012 #5
    Buy CO2 ice cold at 1atm, enclose it (with free volume!) cold at 1atm and warm it enclosed to room temperature so it gets liquid+vapour at 70b, use it.

    You're aware that expanding the gas will cool it and the rest of the tank as well, are you?
     
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