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Compression of Nitrogen

  1. Jan 21, 2014 #1
    Hello, I am currently designing a pressure vessel and am interested in compressing it with nitrogen up to approximately 10 MPa. How would I go about determining the associated temperature rise when this takes place? This will have implications on the strength of the metal used.

    Thank you kindly for your time.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2014 #2

    SteamKing

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    Well, what kind of machine are you planning to use to compress the nitrogen to 10 MPa?
     
  4. Jan 21, 2014 #3
    Sounds like a typical two stage scuba tank compressor would be fine. Keep the destination tanks in flowing tank of water. The compressors have some cooling fins.
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q...4CB3D91543C4B6F&form=CONMHP&conlogo=CT3210127

    New tanks are made of aluminium. Old tanks were steel.

    The temperature rise in the tank depends on how fast you fill it with respect to how efficiently you cool it.. The temperature rise is more important in the compressor itself, but frankly doing this is typical ordinary compressor stuff.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiabatic_process

    The hottest it could get is adiabatic compression. No heat loss.

    T initial /P initial = T final/P final
    P final * T initial/ P initial = T final
    10 MPa * 293 K / 0.1 MPa = 3000 K this is a 100 to 1 compression ratio. A diesel engine operates at 14 to 22 and this ignites the fuel.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
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