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Compton effect?

  • Thread starter asdf1
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  • #1
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for the following question:
for electromagnetic waves A of wavelength 10pm and electromagnetic waves B o f wavelengthh 20 pm, which produces more pronounced Compton effect?

my problem:
the question doesn't give the scattering angle or final wavelength, so isn't this question too ambiguous?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Tide
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The final wavelength depends on the scattering angle so why not compare how they each scatter from a given particle starting at rest?
 
  • #3
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can you explain what do you mean by that?
 
  • #4
Tide
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The change in wavelength in Compton scattering is:

[tex]\Delta \lambda = \frac {h}{m_e c} \left( 1 - \cos \theta \right)[/tex]

where [itex]\theta[/itex] is the scattering angle. You can use that to compare the change in energy of the photons to determine which produces a "more pronounced Compton effect."
 
  • #5
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but delta lamda and cos(cita) are both variables!!!
 
  • #6
Tide
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Indeed they are! So, follow my suggestion to get your answer.
 
  • #7
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maybe my english isn't too good~
i still don't understand what you mean...
@@a
 
  • #8
Astronuc
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How about - the greater the photon energy, i.e. shorter the wavelength, the more momentum the photon has - p = E/c.

Think of conservation of momenutm and energy.
 
  • #9
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@@a
i thought you also had to consider what type of material it hits, because doesn't compton effect has a range?
 
  • #10
Tide
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Your original question was which photon produces a more pronounced Compton effect? Logically, you will keep all other variables the same and only consider what effect the wavelength has on the scattering.
 
  • #11
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i see... so that would be B wavelength produces the more pronouced Compton effect right?
 
  • #12
Tide
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No. The shorter wavelength will produce a more pronounced effect -- BUT -- you have to SHOW it! E.g. calculate how much energy is transferred to the charged particle. You have the basic relations here so you should be able to do that.
 
  • #13
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ok, i get it! thanks!!! :)
 

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