Computations in EE?

  • #1
So I have a background in physics and applied math, but am considering graduate studies in EE. I know that some areas in EE, such as signal and image processing, use alot of applied math, but I'm not that interested in those areas. I'm mostly interested in solid-state, lasers, and optics, but am not too interested in using E&M too much (especially at the level of graduate level theoretical physics E&M). I've looked at some research done by EE professors in those areas, but it seems mostly experimental, with not much computational work. I heard that one area of computational work in EE is computational electromagnetics, which honestly doesn't sound too interesting. I was hoping there were comp. methods used for the quantum mechanics side (other than for quantum computing), since that was my favorite class in physics.

Are N-body simulations, molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and/or other computational tools used in EE, in particular in lasers and solid-state? I really would like to utilize numerical analysis, numerical PDEs, and such for those areas, as I know those are used for other areas of physics, like CFD
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
so does anyone know? from what I've seen of EE profs, its mostly experimental work, with not many people doing computational work
 
  • #3
1,565
7
so does anyone know? from what I've seen of EE profs, its mostly experimental work, with not many people doing computational work

You'll often find that an EE's favorite computational software is solder. It sounds to me like you may want to go into condensed matter physics or perhaps electrochemistry. I think you should research energy storage devices such as super-capacitors, batteries, and even superconductivity. Those are all areas that are more theoretical and the research projects usually begin with a numerical model on a computer.
 
  • #4
You'll often find that an EE's favorite computational software is solder. It sounds to me like you may want to go into condensed matter physics or perhaps electrochemistry. I think you should research energy storage devices such as super-capacitors, batteries, and even superconductivity. Those are all areas that are more theoretical and the research projects usually begin with a numerical model on a computer.

oh, well I'm not all that interested in devices such as capacitors and batteries. I was more interested in devices like lasers. Yeah I guess you're right in that I should just go into condensed matter instead
 

Related Threads on Computations in EE?

Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
25
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
3K
Top