Concept of torque-shear eqn

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This may seem counter-intuitive at first because in other situations, such as torquing a bolt, the farther the distance from the center the less force is required to produce a given torque. However, in this specific case, the torque-shear equation accounts for the distribution of loads and stresses among the bolts in the pattern. In summary, the torque-shear equation takes into account the distribution of loads and stresses among bolts in a pattern, resulting in the highest shear stress and force occurring on the bolt with the largest distance from the center of rotation. This may seem counter-intuitive at first, but it is due to the specific distribution of loads and stresses in the bolt pattern.
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apointyrodent
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For some reason I am having a hard time visualizing the torque-shear equation, specifically when it comes to finding shear in rivet patterns with a non-symmetric load. We have been using the Tr/J formula to find the shear in the individual bolts. However, with this equation with increasing distance from the CG the shear also goes up. This seems counter-intuitive.

For example.. think about torquing a bolt. The farther you are from the center of rotation the less force is required to produce a given torque... so why is the reverse not true? I.e. "Given a constant torque, the farther you are from torque center the less force required to resist it, therefore less stress is induced?"

I've never had a problem with this before but it's been bugging me today for some reason. Thanks.
 
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Your second paragraph is an analogy for comparing two bolt (rivet) patterns, whereas your first paragraph is a question regarding one given bolt pattern. Within a given bolt pattern, the highest shear stress (and therefore shear force) occurs on the bolt having the largest distance from the center of rotation, which is shown by the relation T*r/J.
 

1. What is the concept of torque-shear equation?

The torque-shear equation is a mathematical relationship that describes the relationship between the torque applied to a body and the resulting shear stress and shear strain. It is often used to analyze the strength and stability of structures.

2. How is the torque-shear equation derived?

The torque-shear equation is derived from the principles of mechanics and material behavior, specifically the relationship between force, moment, and stress and strain in a body. It takes into account the geometry, material properties, and loading conditions of the structure in question.

3. What are the applications of the torque-shear equation?

The torque-shear equation has many practical applications in engineering, such as designing and analyzing the strength of beams, columns, and other structural components. It is also used in the design of mechanical systems, such as gears and bearings.

4. What are the assumptions made in the torque-shear equation?

The torque-shear equation is based on certain assumptions, including the linear elastic behavior of the material, small deformations, and uniform distribution of stress and strain. These assumptions may not hold true in all situations and should be carefully considered in the analysis.

5. How does the torque-shear equation relate to other mechanical equations?

The torque-shear equation is closely related to other mechanical equations, such as the bending equation and the torsion equation. These equations are all based on the fundamental principles of mechanics and can be used together to analyze the behavior of a structure under various loading conditions.

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