Configuring band-pass on National MF10 SCF chip

  • Thread starter RG
  • Start date
In summary: First, we can see that the pins are labeled "IN", "OUT", and "GND".The "IN" pin is the input to the SCF chip. The "OUT" pin is the output from the SCF chip. The "GND" pin is the ground pin.From the diagram, it appears that you will be connecting the "IN" pin to the "OUT" pin, and the "OUT" pin to the "GND" pin.From the diagram, it appears that you will be connecting the "IN" pin to the "GND" pin, and the "GND" pin to the "IN" pin.
  • #1
RG
4
0
Hi,
I'm trying to configure the National MF10 Switched Capacitor Filter(SCF) chip to be a bandpass filter.
The problem is that the datasheet has formulas on how to calculate the resistor values for setting up as a band-pass, but there is no example or diagrams to hook up the pins as a band-pass.

The datasheet only shows how to hook up the pins as a low-pass(on page 15).
I have done my calculations , I know what resistors values to use etc..
I only need a diagram to show me how to hook up the pins as a Mode 2, 4th Order band-pass.

the datasheet can be found here --> http://www.national.com/pf/MF/MF10.html

Can anyone familiar with the MF10 please help? :confused:

Drop me a pm if u do not wish to post your reply here, or u know something but not sure if it will work. I'm willing to try it out.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
I haven't used this IC but am willing to brain storm with you.
To make this more fun, can you tell me your desired specs?
I'd like to design along with you.

What is your desired center frequency - fo? what upper fH and
lower fL cutoff frequencies have you chosen (-3dB points)?
What clock frequency & resistor values have you chosen?

From the datasheet, it appears you will be cascading two
stages that are both on chip. Fig 9 (of spec sheet) shows the first stage.
We can deduce a lot of information from that diagram. To make a 4th order,
mode 2 BPF, we can use analogous reasoning as the wiring in diagrams Fig 16 and 17 (page 21) indicate. The difference between those two has to diagrams has to do with supply voltages, which may be applicable if your circuit is limited to TTL or CMOS logic levels.

I have already analyzed Fig 16 and 17 and can offer my thoughts.
Page 8 (pin descriptions) has a lot of useful information. I referred back to
it several times thinking about your filter.
 
  • #3


Hello,

I understand your frustration with the lack of examples or diagrams for configuring the National MF10 SCF chip as a bandpass filter. Unfortunately, the datasheet does not provide specific instructions for this configuration. However, I suggest reaching out to National's technical support team for assistance. They may be able to provide you with the necessary diagrams or guide you through the process of setting up the chip as a bandpass filter.

Additionally, you can also try searching for application notes or tutorials online that may provide step-by-step instructions for configuring the chip as a bandpass filter. I also recommend checking forums or online communities where people have used the MF10 chip in similar applications, as they may have shared their experiences and solutions.

In the meantime, I suggest double-checking your calculations and resistor values to ensure they are accurate. It may also be helpful to consult with an experienced engineer or colleague for their insights and suggestions.

I hope you are able to successfully configure the MF10 chip as a bandpass filter. Best of luck!
 

1. How do I configure a band-pass on the National MF10 SCF chip?

To configure a band-pass on the National MF10 SCF chip, you will need to use a combination of external components such as resistors and capacitors. These components will determine the center frequency and bandwidth of the band-pass filter. You can refer to the MF10 SCF chip's datasheet for specific values and configurations.

2. What is the purpose of configuring a band-pass on the National MF10 SCF chip?

The National MF10 SCF chip is a versatile signal conditioning chip that can be used for various applications, including filtering. By configuring a band-pass on the chip, you can selectively allow a specific range of frequencies to pass through while attenuating others. This is useful in applications such as audio processing and radio frequency filtering.

3. Can I change the band-pass configuration on the National MF10 SCF chip?

Yes, the band-pass configuration on the National MF10 SCF chip can be changed by adjusting the external components. However, it is important to note that the chip has a limited range of frequencies it can handle, so the band-pass configuration should be within the chip's specifications.

4. How do I test the band-pass configuration on the National MF10 SCF chip?

To test the band-pass configuration on the National MF10 SCF chip, you can use a signal generator to input a range of frequencies and observe the output using an oscilloscope. You can also use a spectrum analyzer to verify that the desired frequency range is being passed through while others are attenuated.

5. Are there any limitations to configuring a band-pass on the National MF10 SCF chip?

While the National MF10 SCF chip is a versatile signal conditioning chip, there are some limitations to configuring a band-pass on it. These include the limited frequency range, the need for external components, and potential signal distortion if the configuration is not within the chip's specifications. It is important to carefully select and design the band-pass configuration to ensure optimal performance.

Similar threads

  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
798
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
31
Views
710
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top