Confirming the Quote: "What can be spoken needs not to be drawn

  • Thread starter pixel01
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Quote
In summary, the conversation is discussing the origin of the quote "What can be spoken needs not to be drawn." Some believe it to be Picasso's quote, but there is uncertainty. The idea behind the quote is that a quick drawing can often convey more than words. The conversation also references other related quotes such as "A picture is worth a thousand words" and "Silence is golden".
  • #1
pixel01
688
1
I am not sure if this question is suitable here. Please help.

We are discussing who said this : " What can be spoken needs not to be drawn".
Some say it's Picasso's quote. Can anybody confirm?

Thank you.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Pixel, if no one claims it, it's yours.
 
  • #3
pixel01 said:
" What can be spoken needs not to be drawn".
It's hard for me to imagine a painter saying that.
 
  • #4
I myself find it hard to believe.
Thanks
 
  • #5
Wasn't it

What can be drawn needs not to be spoken
?
 
  • #6
That would make more sense. You can often talk until you're blue in the face but a quick drawing of what you're trying to describe will make it clear.
 
  • #7
Evo said:
That would make more sense. You can often talk until you're blue in the face but a quick drawing of what you're trying to describe will make it clear.

especially if you are trying to describe being blue in the face.
 
  • #8
How about P.T. Wordsworth's famous quote "A picture is worth a thousand words". Since "a word to the wise is sufficient", one one thousandth of a picture should be sufficient to the wise. I'm pretty sure that one one thousandth of what Picasso laughingly called a picture is sufficient to me and I'm not even wise. Perhaps what he really meant was that his pictures were unspeakable. Then again "wisdom is worth more than gold" and "silence is golden". Maybe the quote should be "Shut up!"
 
Last edited:

Related to Confirming the Quote: "What can be spoken needs not to be drawn

What does the quote "What can be spoken needs not to be drawn" mean?

The quote means that if something can be expressed or communicated through words, there is no need to illustrate or draw it.

Who is the author of this quote?

The author of this quote is unknown, but it is often attributed to the Chinese philosopher, Lao Tzu.

Is there any deeper meaning behind this quote?

Some interpret this quote as a reminder to use words wisely and to not rely on visual aids too much. Others see it as a commentary on the power of language and its ability to convey ideas and concepts without the need for visual representation.

What is the significance of this quote in science?

In science, this quote can be seen as a reminder to effectively communicate ideas and findings through words and data rather than relying solely on visual aids. It also emphasizes the importance of clear and concise language in scientific research and communication.

How can this quote be applied in everyday life?

This quote can serve as a reminder to communicate effectively and use words to express ideas and emotions rather than relying on visual aids. It can also encourage individuals to pay attention to their chosen words and use them wisely in all forms of communication.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
924
Replies
6
Views
798
Replies
3
Views
825
Replies
3
Views
523
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
558
Replies
2
Views
72
Replies
6
Views
542
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • General Engineering
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top