1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Conservation of energy relativity problem

  1. Apr 14, 2004 #1
    Hi could someone please help me with this question. I don't know where to start. :rolleyes:

    A certain amount of energy is obtained from conversion of 5.00 grams of mass. How much mass could this energy raise to a height of 96 m?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 14, 2004 #2

    Tom Mattson

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Hi,

    Use conservation of energy. The energy produced in the conversion (which you can caluculate by the most famous equation in physics) is equal to the gravitational potential energy. The only thing you don't know is the mass of the object that is raised to 96m.
     
  4. Apr 14, 2004 #3
    um...

    so it's 1/2mv^2 = mgh?
    how would i get v?

    If i use conservation of energy, then I don't have to use E=mc^2?

    :confused:
     
  5. Apr 14, 2004 #4

    JJ

    User Avatar

    You use mc^2=Mgh. mc^2 is still energy.
     
  6. Apr 14, 2004 #5

    Tom Mattson

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Is that the most famous equation in all of physics?

    Nooooooo

    C'mon, think Einstein.
     
  7. Apr 14, 2004 #6
    thanks...i actually realized how to do it when i looked through the chapter again...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Conservation of energy relativity problem
Loading...