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Constant a

  1. Sep 16, 2004 #1
    sorry i didnt use latex..I tried...its annoying


    V=V(initial) + at....when you integrate both sides you get x=x(initial) + ..?
    I had a little trouble trying to integrate the (at) do you use the uv-integral(v DV) theorm...well i used that and it and it didnt give me the second equation for constant a...near to it but off by two terms. Would anyone be kind enough to show me?
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2004 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Somethings messed up with your formatting. Is your question how to get from this:
    [tex]v = v_0 + at[/tex]
    to this:
    [tex]x = x_0 + v_0 t + 1/2 a t^2[/tex]
    If so, it's straightforward integration, since v = dx/dt.
     
  4. Sep 16, 2004 #3
    I understand the first two terms must give you x and x initial. But I cant seem to grasp where the rest..are you integrating from time initial to time t?
     
  5. Sep 16, 2004 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, you are integrating both terms, [itex]v_0[/itex] and [itex]a t[/itex], from the initial time (t = 0) to t. [itex]x_0[/itex] is just the integration constant = initial position.
     
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