Container of Water Work Problem

In summary, the conversation is about finding the work required to pump all the water out of a tank with a volume of y=x^4 and a height of 16 meters. The individual is unsure where they went wrong in their calculation and is seeking assistance in determining the force and distance needed to calculate the work. They mention using the formula W = FD, where F is equal to VDg. They also mention struggling with expressing the force and distance, specifically using the equation (pi/16)y^3dy.
  • #1
Richter915
37
0
You have a container which has the volume of y=x^4 from y=0 to y=16. This tank is filled with water...how much work is required to pump all of the water out of this 16 meter tall tank. I'm not too sure where I went wrong here because I know work is the integral of Force times Distance. Please help, thanks.
 
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  • #2
What is the force in this case? And what is the distance? How can you express the force and the distance?

Jameson
 
  • #3
It is impossible for us to tell you where you went wrong if you don't tell us what you did!
 
  • #4
[tex]W = FD[/tex]
[tex]F = VDg[/tex]
[tex]W = \int (1000)(9.8)(V)(D)[/tex]


This is where I run into a problem...I put that VD equals (pi/16)y^3dy. I really am not sure what to do from here because that's where my mistake is. Please help.
 

1. How does the Container of Water Work Problem relate to science?

The Container of Water Work Problem is a common scientific experiment used to demonstrate the principles of work, energy, and pressure. It involves using a small container of water to lift a larger container of water to a certain height, and the amount of work done in the process can be calculated using basic physics equations.

2. What materials are needed for the Container of Water Work Problem?

To conduct the Container of Water Work Problem, you will need two containers of different sizes, water, a ruler or measuring tape, and a scale. You may also need a calculator for calculating work and energy.

3. How does the height of the water in the containers affect the amount of work done?

The height of the water in the containers is directly related to the amount of work done. The higher the water is lifted, the more work is done. This is because work is the product of force and distance, and in this case, the force is the weight of the water and the distance is the height it is lifted to.

4. What are some real-life applications of the Container of Water Work Problem?

The Container of Water Work Problem can be applied to various real-life situations, such as using a pulley system to lift heavy objects, pumping water from a well, or filling a tall container with liquid. It can also be used to understand the concept of potential energy and how it can be converted into kinetic energy.

5. Are there any variations of the Container of Water Work Problem?

Yes, there are many variations of the Container of Water Work Problem, such as changing the size or shape of the containers, using different liquids, or adding obstacles to the process. These variations can help further explore the principles of work and energy and can be used to conduct more complex experiments.

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