Continuous Angular Velocity?

In summary, Satellite 2, which is in a circular heliocentric orbit with radius R and angular velocity O', undergoes a low continuous thrust which may result in an elliptic orbit or an outward spiraling orbit. The thrust vector is perpendicular to a line connecting Satellite 2 to Satellite 1 and the Sun, causing tangential thrust. It is unclear how this acceleration will affect the maintenance of angular velocity O'. Further research on the relationship between tangential velocity, radius, gravity, and centrifugal force is needed to determine if O' can be maintained by the accelerating satellite.
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TL;DR Summary
Can a satellite that undergoes a low continuous thrust maintain the same angular velocity as a satellite that does not undergo said thrust?
Suppose two satellites are in a circular heliocentric orbit with radius R and with angular velocity O'. Satellite 2 then undergoes a low continuous thrust. Can Satellite 2 (the one that undergoes the continuous low thrust) maintain the same angular velocity O' about the sun?

It seems that Satellite 2 may now be in an elliptic orbit (or outward spiraling orbit) and presumably its thrust vector is perpendicular to a line connecting Satellite 2 to Satellite 1, to the Sun. (Tangential thrust).

How might one go about proving that angular velocity (O') can be maintained as Satellite 2 accelerates (if it is possible at all)?

P.S. I think I am confused about whether increasing tangential velocity increases radius in a way that would prohibit O' from being maintained by the accelerating satellite.
 
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  • #2
I did a quick & dirty numerical simulation... First I put a James Webb in a circular orbit around the sun at 1AU (with no planets). Next I doubled the distance to 2AU without changing the orbital velocity. The spacecraft at 2AU with enough orbital velocity for a 1AU circular orbit escapes the Sun (no orbit).

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Or if you start with a circular orbit at 1AU then double the orbital speed, you also leave the solar system (no orbit)...
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  • #3
Look up (Google?) how gravity varies with distance.
Then look up how centrifugal force varies with orbital speed or distance.

Have Fun and Learn Much!
Tom
 
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1. What is continuous angular velocity?

Continuous angular velocity is a measure of how quickly an object is rotating around a fixed point. It is typically expressed in units of radians per second or degrees per second.

2. How is continuous angular velocity different from linear velocity?

Continuous angular velocity is a measure of rotational motion, while linear velocity is a measure of straight-line motion. Continuous angular velocity takes into account the direction of rotation, while linear velocity only considers speed and direction of motion.

3. What factors affect continuous angular velocity?

The factors that affect continuous angular velocity include the size and shape of the rotating object, the distance from the center of rotation, and any external forces acting on the object.

4. How is continuous angular velocity measured?

Continuous angular velocity is typically measured using a sensor such as an accelerometer or a gyroscope. These sensors can detect changes in rotational motion and provide measurements of angular velocity.

5. Why is continuous angular velocity important?

Continuous angular velocity is important for understanding and predicting the behavior of rotating objects, such as wheels, gears, and turbines. It is also important in fields such as physics, engineering, and astronomy, where rotational motion plays a significant role.

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