Contracting substance under decreased pressure?

  • Thread starter AcidRainLiTE
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Pressure
So, in summary, it is not possible for a substance to contract under a decrease in pressure, as stated by the gas law equation.
  • #1
AcidRainLiTE
90
2
I know this seems impossible, and it probably is, but is there a substance (a solid) that will contract under a decrease in pressure?
If I place the substance in a sealed container at say atmospheric pressure and then suck out the air to make it almost a vacuum, I need the substance to have a smaller volume when the container is a vacuum than when it is at 1atm.
The reason that I leave a very small possibility for there to be a such a substance is because I am wondering if the temperature of the substance will change when it is in a vacuum causing the volume to change as well.

Thanks.
 
Chemistry news on Phys.org
  • #2
No, there is no known substance that will contract under a decrease in pressure. The reason for this is because of the gas law equation: PV = nRT, where P is pressure, V is volume, n is the number of moles, R is the gas constant, and T is temperature. This equation states that if pressure decreases, then volume also decreases, meaning that the overall volume of a substance or material cannot change as a result of a decrease in pressure.
 
  • #3


It is highly unlikely that a solid substance would contract under decreased pressure. According to the ideal gas law, pressure and volume are inversely proportional, meaning that as pressure decreases, volume increases. This is consistent with our everyday experience, as we see objects expand when taken to higher altitudes where the air pressure is lower.

There are some exceptions to this rule, such as water freezing at high pressures, but these are due to changes in the molecular structure of the substance, not simply a decrease in pressure. In order for a solid substance to contract under decreased pressure, it would have to undergo a significant change in its molecular structure, which is highly unlikely.

Additionally, the temperature of a substance in a vacuum would not change significantly unless it is exposed to extreme temperatures or radiation. So, it is unlikely that a change in temperature would cause a significant change in volume.

In conclusion, while it is not impossible for a substance to contract under decreased pressure, it is highly unlikely and not supported by scientific principles. It is more likely that the substance would expand or remain the same volume under decreased pressure.
 

Related to Contracting substance under decreased pressure?

1. What is contracting substance under decreased pressure?

Contracting substance under decreased pressure refers to the process of reducing the pressure on a substance, causing it to decrease in volume or contract.

2. How does decreasing pressure affect a substance?

Decreasing pressure on a substance causes its molecules to move closer together, resulting in a decrease in volume. This is because the molecules have less space to move around and are forced to occupy a smaller space.

3. What types of substances contract under decreased pressure?

Most gases and liquids will contract under decreased pressure, while solids usually do not change significantly in volume. However, this can vary depending on the specific properties of the substance.

4. What is the purpose of contracting substances under decreased pressure?

Contracting substances under decreased pressure can have various purposes, such as creating a vacuum, extracting gas from a mixture, or reducing the volume of a substance for storage or transportation.

5. Can contracting substances under decreased pressure be dangerous?

Yes, contracting substances under decreased pressure can be dangerous if proper precautions are not taken. This is because the sudden decrease in pressure can cause the substance to rapidly expand, potentially causing explosions or other hazards. It is important to follow safety protocols and use appropriate equipment when working with contracting substances under decreased pressure.

Similar threads

Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
585
  • Chemistry
Replies
1
Views
4K
Replies
26
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
24
Views
1K
Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
20
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
2K
Back
Top