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Control Engineering terms

  1. Jan 4, 2017 #1
    I would like to ask about some terms of control engineering.

    What are other common expressions for "moving a pickoff point" which can be used as" moving a pickoff point behind of a block" or as "moving a pickoff point ahead of block."

    Source:Self-made

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 5, 2017 #2

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    "pick-off point" seems good enough. "tap point" is one alternative.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2017 #3
    What are the other common expressions for "summing junction" ?

    Thank you.
     
  5. Jan 20, 2017 #4

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    "summing junction" is probably the most common term used. If you use a particular software package, there may be a similar term. MathWorks SimuLink calls them a "summing block". But MATRIXx SystemBuild calls them a "summing junction".

    PS. If you are writing something, I recommend that you avoid a variety of terms and just use one standard term all the way through. I have spent hours upon hours wondering if some term in a document meant something different from another similar term, when they really meant the same thing.
     
  6. Jan 21, 2017 #5
    Some people use "summing point" or "junction point" instead of "summing junction" so what do you think about these alternatives?

    Thank you.
     
  7. Jan 21, 2017 #6
    Could "node", too, be alternative of them ?

    Thank you.
     
  8. Jan 21, 2017 #7

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    "node" is a good general term. If you want to imply that the node is a place where a signal is being observed or split off to another place, "pick-off point" implies that and is better.
     
  9. Jan 22, 2017 #8
    I am not sure but some people might call summing junctions as substractors.

    Thank you.
     
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