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Conversations with God

  1. Mar 31, 2005 #1
    Has anyone read the book Litigations as Spiritual Practice by Attorney George Felos, he is Michael Schiavo's lawyer who has now achieved a singular landmark achievement of having a case successfully withstanding the review by over several dozen state and federal courts over a 7-year period. Standing in front of a huge press of reporters, the attorney apparently said last Saturday, "Frankly when I saw her... she looked beautiful. In all the years I've seen Mrs. Schiavo, I've never seen such a look of peace and beauty upon her." According to James Tarantano (Source), this is "the creepiest moment in the Terri Schiavo saga" and goes on to point out a book that George Felos wrote in 2002, entitled " Litigation as Spiritual Practice."

    "In that book, Felos describes his contact with Estelle Browning, his first right-to-die case, and how he "sensed her soul in agony" and how his soul touched her as he stood next to her in her nursing home bed.

    I don't believe that we can prove or disprove there is a God. I'm wondering how he can have a conversation with God and "sense her soul in agony?"
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 31, 2005 #2
    Willful blindness and Wishfull thinking.
     
  4. Mar 31, 2005 #3

    Danger

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    As much as it galls me to agree with you :wink: , that sums it up just about perfectly.
     
  5. Mar 31, 2005 #4
    haha, i am wondering the same abuot what is the proof when dose ppl claim they spoke with God.

    God messengers and prophets are another story, [well, if X show a miracle that God spoke to him , so that be it] And whether we can prove God or no is another story too, I have a logical proof that God do exist. However, i dont want to kill this thread!

    [Well, if some one willing ot open a thread abuot it, i might go and share]

    >End of my two pennys<
     
  6. Mar 31, 2005 #5
    I'm sorry but since you've said I want to know your proof.
    You may as well if you have the time.
    And I'm sure most people won't care.
    It definitely won't kill the thread I don't think.
    I just have two words for you COME ON...COME ON ;)
     
  7. Mar 31, 2005 #6

    QF bloody E.
     
  8. Mar 31, 2005 #7
    Maybe the agonized comatose give off a smell that affects one's subconscious. Chemical cues, like the way the sick smell sick.

    Or maybe it is wishful thinking on his part.
     
  9. Mar 31, 2005 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    I have mentioned this before and found a link once, but there was a very interesting book written primarily by an aids hospice nurse, with contributions from over a dozen other hospice workers - doctors, RNs, LVNs, etc. The thesis of the book was that "you don't want to miss your own death"; ie. the dying process. The experiences described by these medical workers was nothing short of staggering and quite inspirational - in much the same light as discussed here, and much, much more. I don't remember the name of that book in particular, but when looking for it I found many others much like it. It seems that you won't find many athiests among the world's foremost experts on death.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2005
  10. Mar 31, 2005 #9

    Danger

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    Nor physicists... :rolleyes:
     
  11. Mar 31, 2005 #10
    What the bloody hell does that mean?
     
  12. Mar 31, 2005 #11
    The hell you talking about willis?

    Physicists are predominately non-religious. Among NSF members i think it was 10% believed in God.
     
  13. Mar 31, 2005 #12

    QFE = Quoted For Emphasis
     
  14. Mar 31, 2005 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    Sorry??? How many mornings make a purple you say?
     
  15. Mar 31, 2005 #14
    I tried to have a conversation with God once..he told me to shut-up cause there were people with real problems out there..kinda made me feel better.
     
  16. Mar 31, 2005 #15

    Danger

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    That's what I meant. If the majority of death experts aren't atheists, then obviously the majority are not hard scientists. They're most likely sociologists, psychologists, clergy, mercenaries...

    You're confused, son. I take the blue one in the morning. (I'm too busy with you weirdos at night.) :tongue:
     
  17. Mar 31, 2005 #16
    In a National Review article yesterday, Eric Pfeiffer said it very succinctly
    I must admit I have not seen the phrase "three sheets to the moonbeam" although I can guess what it means. The term "three sheets to the wind" means to be drunk (Source):
    The first written example of this salty saying apparently comes from "that recorder of low life, Pierce Egan, in his Real life in London of 1821. But it must surely be much older." (Source). Presumably, "three sheets to the moonbeam" is more than very drunk but suffering from drunken delusions. The Oxford English Dictionary does not contain any references to "three sheets to the moonbeam" although it cites Shakespeare, "To fanne the Moone-beames from his sleeping eyes". So, I must conclude that the Schiavo case is giving rise to new poetic aspirations.
     
  18. Mar 31, 2005 #17

    Danger

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    An everyday turn of phrase for us Canuks, although more prevailent in the Maritimes. We also refer to it as 'half-seas over'. :smile:
     
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