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Conversion- MeV to V?

  1. May 17, 2005 #1
    Hello- is it possible to convert MeV to V???? If so, how is it done? For example if a particle is emmitted with an energy of 4.19MeV- how can this be changed into V???? Any help is greatly appreciated.
     
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  3. May 17, 2005 #2

    Pengwuino

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    They are not teh same unit of measure. eV is a unit of energy (1.602 x 10^19 ev = 1 Joule) and V is electrical potential. I think my intro to modern physics said its the energy required to move an electron through a 1 volt potential
     
  4. May 17, 2005 #3

    jtbell

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    Is it possible to convert apples to oranges? The MeV (mega-electron-volt) is a unit of energy. The V (volt) is a unit of electrical potential difference.

    The volt and the electron-volt are related in that if you take a particle that has a charge equal in magnitude to that on an electron (1.6e-19 coulomb) and accelerate or decelerate it by sending it through a potential difference of one volt, it will gain or lose one electron-volt of energy (which is just another name for 1.6e-19 J of energy).

    You can't change the 4.19 MeV into V because they're different kinds of physical quantities. But you can say that in order to bring the particle to a stop, you'd have to send it through a potential difference of -4.19 MV (megavolts).
     
  5. May 17, 2005 #4

    Pengwuino

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    Simple newbie mistake. I was wondering how to convert eV to volts too. I saw it as "electron-volts" and "volts" and thought, pff, duh! has to be the same! lol.
     
  6. May 17, 2005 #5

    dextercioby

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    You may wanna rethink that... :wink:

    Daniel.
     
  7. May 17, 2005 #6

    Pengwuino

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    What, whats wrong with that?
     
  8. May 17, 2005 #7

    dextercioby

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    Everything.

    [tex] 1eV\simeq 1.6\cdot 10^{-19}J [/tex]

    DO you see the difference...?

    Daniel.
     
  9. May 18, 2005 #8
    edited for screwing this up myself too.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  10. May 18, 2005 #9

    Pengwuino

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    Somehow...thinking if 1.602e^-19 J = 1eV then shouldnt 1.602e^19 eV = 1J... I have yet to do a homework problem or exam problem where i got the answer wrong... maybe its because i was rarely ever asked for an answer in Joules...
     
  11. May 18, 2005 #10
    No. Think about it. What do you divide 1.602e^-19 by to make it equal to 1?
     
  12. May 18, 2005 #11
    Need to review your scientific notation.

    2E-03 = 0.002

    The inverse of 2E-03 is not 2E+03 = 2000

    Since 2000 * 0.002 = 4.
     
  13. May 18, 2005 #12

    Pengwuino

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    Obviously all i thought was "pff, to get 1.602e^-19 to equal 1, you must multiply it by 1.602e^19! ". Just one of those things that for some reason, all your knowledge takes a day off and you think of the most assanine way of converting something.
     
  14. May 18, 2005 #13

    Pengwuino

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    lol i like how the google targeted search result shows an advertisement for "Adult/Youth Basic Skills"
     
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