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Convert 120Watts to 15000Watts

  1. Feb 4, 2007 #1
    Combine 1V @ 60A = 60Watts
    250V @ 0.24A = 60Watts

    So my big question is, can I take that two separately 60watt power supply = 120watt
    And make it give me a output of total 250V @ 60A = 15000Watts :rolleyes:
    Combine the to inputs and feed it to a transformer
    In theory, I will end up with 120Watts and not 15000Watts :yuck:
    and how does it work, that I can send a DC source of 28V @ 10A and 250V @ 0.30A down the same cable but that 10A doesn’t help then it come to the 250V
    So that 10A it’s only available then it comes to the 28V loads and the same with the 250V @ 0.30A

    So does anyone know a solution?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 4, 2007 #2
    This makes absolutely no sense to me.
     
  4. Feb 4, 2007 #3

    brewnog

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    I don't follow either.

    A power supply won't just deliver its rated current. That's the maximum which can be drawn. Two power supplies rated at 60W will give you 120W at best.
     
  5. Feb 4, 2007 #4

    russ_watters

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    Wow. You need to start learning the basics of how electricity works before you hurt yourself. Voltage is the force that drives electricity. You can't have two different voltages at the same time. That's like running water at two different pressures in the same pipe at the same time.
     
  6. Feb 4, 2007 #5
    Yip I understand what your saying, it’s just interesting to give the impossible stuff a go, nothing is impossible


    Russ waters, what you’ve meant is you cant have a thin high pressured water line and a big low pressured line connected to the same water line, but it’s still interesting to think about it
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2007
  7. Feb 4, 2007 #6

    brewnog

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    Getting 15,000 Watts out of a 120 W supply is impossible. Don't let anyone tell you rubbish about nothing being impossible in physics. There are many things which are impossible, this is why science as you are taught it is based upon laws which have been shown to be true.

    Thinking about impossibilities may well be interesting, but expecting meaningful answers from asking meaningless questions isn't.
     
  8. Feb 4, 2007 #7
    Hear, hear. Perhaps this explanation helps: power is the time rate of change of energy. Your power supplies are only capable of each providing a maximum of 60 J of energy per second, and you want 15000 J per second out. Conservation of energy (ie. you can't get out more than what you put in) says that you can only get at most 120 J per second out (assuming no energy loss).

    A transformer can increase the voltage AND reduce the current, or reduce the voltage AND increase the current. It can't increase both. Hence a transformer cannot give you more power than what you put in. (Remember: POWER = VOLTAGE * CURRENT).
     
  9. Feb 5, 2007 #8
    On some wall adapter, why does the wattage # doesn't follow the equation p=vi? The adapter has output voltage and current but when u times them together it doesn't = to the wattage # that is printed on the adapter
     
  10. Feb 5, 2007 #9

    russ_watters

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    You're going to waste a lot of time and energy spinning your wheels in place if you hold on to that attitude. It is naive and untrue.
    No, it isn't. Its useless (at best) speculation that leads to an incorrect understanding of science.

    Look, science is tough enough without purposely learning things that are wrong. Our brain power is finite and eventually, you will forget what is real and what is just idle speculation of yours and it'll hurt you. Unless, that is, you are going to become a science fiction writer, though I still think this idea is badly enough wrong that it would even hurt you there.

    Today, I'm going to work on the design of a chilled water system for a cocoa processing plant. It requires 32F and 68F water - how's about I tell my boss that instead of using two chillers or one chiller and two loops separated by a heat exchanger we just use one chiller and run two different temperatures of water in the same pipe? Think of the money we'd save in construction!
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2007
  11. Feb 5, 2007 #10

    russ_watters

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    It doesn't? It should. My laptop's adapter says 19.5V*3.3A=65w. Close enough.
     
  12. Feb 5, 2007 #11
    Two different temperatures of water in the same pipe? The outcome will probably be:
    (32F + 68F)/2= 50F depending on the pressure and thickness of the pipes, to get a more accurate average temp.

    And to my crazy idea, it will be pressure=Voltage and pipe size=Amps
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2007
  13. Feb 5, 2007 #12
    And to make a high pressure, small size pipe to give me a high pressure, big size pipe water flow I will nee:
    (1) Some T connecters to get more water pipe inputs
    (2) Heavy duty water pump, but this will suck the water source empty in a very shorts period
    (3) toss the right amount of hydrogen and oxygen 2:1 together and ignite //or use a fuel cell to make water

    Are there any way of using carbon and oxygen to feed a fuel cell or any make-able device, because my lung feed on it?!
    Human use 90% oxygen and 10% food to generate energy to be able to go on this his/her life, any way of researching into that??

    And that’s the main energy source in food, probably glucose ( C6H12O6 )
     
  14. Feb 5, 2007 #13

    russ_watters

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    We're done here. Jacquesl, this isn't the place to post your mental vomit.
     
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