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Convolution homework help

  • Thread starter FrogPad
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  • #1
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The following is all in discrete time, n is an integer

We are given that:
[tex] h_2(n) = \delta ( n ) + \delta ( n-1 ) [/tex]

I want to find the convolution of h2[n]*h2[n].

I don't really understand how to solve this properly.

So,
[tex] y(n) = \Sigma_{k=-\infty}^{k=\infty} (\delta(n)+\delta(n-1)) \times (\delta(n-k)+\delta(n-k-1)) [/tex]

So the [tex] (\delta(n)+\delta(n-1)) [/tex] pulls out because it is constant.

So,

[tex] y(n) = (\delta(n)+\delta(n-1)) \Sigma_{k=-\infty}^{k=\infty} \delta(n-k)+\delta(n-k-1) [/tex]

How do I even solve this?
The book gets
h_2(n)*h_2(n) = [tex] \delta(n) + \2\delta(n-1) + \delta(n-2) [/tex]

I don't understand how they get this.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
D H
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[tex] y(n) = \Sigma_{k=-\infty}^{k=\infty} (\delta(n)+\delta(n-1)) \times (\delta(n-k)+\delta(n-k-1)) [/tex]

So the [tex] (\delta(n)+\delta(n-1)) [/tex] pulls out because it is constant.
You are not calculating the convolution correctly.

[tex](h_2\ast h_2)(n) = \sum_{k=-\infty}^{\infty}\cdot h_2(k) h_2(n-k)[/tex]
 
  • #3
809
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omg....

haha


I'm going to to take a walk. That was a ridiculous mistake.

thanks man :)
 

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