Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Coordinate transformations

  1. Mar 28, 2005 #1

    od7

    User Avatar

    Hi.

    I’ve just started learning about tensors on my own and am still trying to understand coordinate transformations.

    If I begin with a vector whose Cartesian components are (x, y, z) and apply the tensor transformation to cylindrical polars, I end up with (r, 0, z) – is this right? I anticipated (r, phi, z) – have I made an error or am I not understanding something?

    Please help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 28, 2005 #2

    mathwonk

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    2015 Award

    i am not sure what you are doing, but it seems fishy to go from three variables to two. i.e. from a description of three space, to a description of a piece of the plane
     
  4. Mar 28, 2005 #3

    robphy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    It seems you wish to write a vector [tex] \vec V[/tex]
    given in rectangular components
    [tex] \vec V= V_x \hat x + V_y \hat y + V_z \hat z[/tex]
    in terms of cylindrical polar components
    [tex] \vec V=V_r \hat r + V_\phi \hat \phi + V_z \hat z[/tex].
     
  5. Mar 28, 2005 #4

    od7

    User Avatar

    I am trying to understand the tensor transformation law by applying it directly to a concrete example. If [tex] \vec V=V_x \hat x + V_y \hat \y + V_z \hat z[/tex] then what do I end up with once I have applied the law?
     
  6. Apr 14, 2005 #5
    Could you show the tensor transformation law you are using and the details of your calculation?
     
  7. Apr 16, 2005 #6

    jcsd

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I'm not clear what it is exactly you're trying to do.

    If you start out with a vector with compoents in caretsian cooridnates of (x,y,z) the coponents in cylindrical coordinates are (√(x^2 + y^2),arctan(y/x),z)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?