Copper gluconate

  1. Hi
    I only have very few materials which are (calcium gluconate , zinc gluconate , ferrous gluconate ) and copper wires
    can i make copper gluconate using these?
    help please
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    Your first problem will be with dissolving copper, you need a relatively strong oxidizer for that - none of the substances mentioned will work.
     
  4. what if i use copper electrodes in water then put some zinc gluconate ? will this work
     
  5. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    No, unless you find a way to precipitate zinc from the solution. Do you know how the double replacement reaction (AKA metathesis) works? Do you know how it works in solutions? Do you know what the net ionic reaction is?
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
  6. No. Sadly i'm a newb. I'm trying to make any copper salt (not hydroxide or cholride) i've tried electrolysis on drinking water with copper electrodes,it gave blue solution then after a while green precipitate . what are these salts carbonate? hydroxide?
     
  7. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    Most likely basic carbonate (so neither carbonate nor hydroxide, but something in between).
     
  8. If it was chlorinated drinking water, a blue solution with green+white precipitate sounds like copper chloride.
    To make copper gluconate it would probably be easiest to use pure water with gluconate ions and copper and zinc electrodes, with excess zinc gluconate dissolved. Applying a current would move the zinc cations onto the zinc electrode, while moving the gluconate onto the copper electrode while moving some copper ions into solution.
     
  9. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    There is not enough Cl- in chlorinated water for copper chloride in substantial amounts.

    No, that will not work. Once you have even traces of copper in the solution it will deposit preferentially on the cathode, leaving zinc in the solution. That's what reactivity series is about. You can't remove zinc as long as there are less reactive metals present (in fact looking at reduction potentials you should expect hydrogen evolving instead of zinc deposition even in the solution with no other ions).
     
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