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Copy right Free

  1. Jan 26, 2007 #1
    Hello,

    Where can I get questions (physics/math) which are copy right free.
    Thanks,

    Gamma.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 26, 2007 #2
    Are you seeking to publish a book on solutions to exercises?

    Nobody owns exercises that that ask to prove a theorem.
     
  4. Jan 26, 2007 #3

    Evo

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    Staff: Mentor

    Do you mean papers that have now become public domain? Are you looking for old books or old information online? If it's online, try doing a search in google or another search engine on either the author or specific problem, or title.
     
  5. Jan 26, 2007 #4
    To use in my website. I have a collection of questions that I answered when I worked for a tutoring service. (about 200 of them). I worked hard on these questions. However, the questions does not belong to me. Now I am looking for fresh questions to answer.

    Books that are in public domain are pretty old. Aren't they? I will check that out too.


    Gamma.
     
  6. Jan 26, 2007 #5
    are questions from a book actually copyrighted? besides, if the solutions are your own, especially if there was no solution in the orginal book, i don't think there would be a problem.
     
  7. Jan 27, 2007 #6

    Evo

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    Staff: Mentor

    His answers would have become the intellectual property of the company he worked for.
     
  8. Jan 27, 2007 #7
    I would like to know the answer to this. I thought they are copyrighted.


    Right, the answer is an intellectual property of the company as well as mine. But the question was supplied to me by the company to be answered. That is why the question is not mine. Now, what do I do with only a bunch of solutions? I may be able to change the question, perhaps changing some quantities within the question. That will involve a lot of work in my part.
     
  9. Jan 27, 2007 #8
    I don't think questions from a book are copyrighted. Many textbooks (from different authors and publishers) share common questions with just different wording, especially the proof questions. As for calculational questions, I guess every question is unique in the numbers and functions being used, but the idea and goals of the questions are also shared among many textbooks.
     
  10. Jan 28, 2007 #9

    Evo

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    Staff: Mentor

    It depends on what kind of agreements you signed with your company. Hopefully you have a copy of your intellectual property and non-compete agreements. Have an attorney look them over.

    For example my company cannot claim my pre-existing intellectual property, but then it gets blurred where my pre-existing knowledge works with knowledge developed while at my current company. It can get quite messy.

    In college, a professor asked me to sign a waiver to allow him to use some of my work in a text book he was writing. Although I allowed him the right to print it giving me credit, it still remained mine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2007
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