Copying DVD

  • Thread starter Dagenais
  • Start date
  • #1
271
3
Yes, I know what you're thinking, "It's illegal."

It is however positively for my own use.

Plus, I spent bundles on this DVD-RW. I plan on using it.

Unfortunately the DVD I want to copy is "protected." Is there anyway I can still copy it? I'm not going to sell it or anything, I just want to test my DVD-RW.

I'm using RECORDNOW! Which came with Windows XP.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
dduardo
Staff Emeritus
1,890
3
Try finding some software called DVD X Copy.

Here company's site:

http://www.dvdxcopy.com/

Unfortunetly, a recent court judgement ruled the software illegal, but the company is in the process of trying to get that ruling overturned. I think it is perfectly legal to make backups of your own media.
 
  • #3
271
3
I'm a Canadian citizen. I don't think those laws apply to me.

I tried http://www.doom9.org.

There instructions were horribly written. I encrypted the movie to my HD. Then I found out at the end that I was suppose to change the mode to IHO (or something like that), as opposed to the default (file).

Cheez, that's why I dislike most online guides/tutorials. Most of the writers have no idea what they are doing skipping steps, or making it unclear for newbies like me.

I just checked the site. The software costs $149? Is there any free software out there?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
Yes there's a free software. It's pretty good and it works. This is a similar program that DVD X copy charges you for $150+

You will need to decrypt the files before you can do anything. So have at least 10 gb of free hard drive space for one movie.
You can get the programs DVD Decrypt and DVD Shrink from the link provided. Just make sure to read the instructions carefully.

Link Here
Step 1: Decrypt the DVD

Production companies encrypt DVDs, so you'll need to decrypt the video files before you can do anything else. Insert the DVD into your DVD drive and run an application called DVD Decrypter. It will decrypt (go figure) and store the disc's video object (VOB) files to your hard drive. You're going to need at least 10GB of free hard-drive space per DVD.

Step 2: Shrink the DVD

Store-bought DVD movies use dual-layered discs to store twice as much information as home-burned DVDs. You'll need to shrink the VOB files you just decrypted so they can fit on a single DVD-R or DVD+R disc. Using an application called DVD Shrink, select the features, scenes, and compression rate for your final DVD backup. Click the Backup button to begin the burn.

Step 3: Burn your DVD

Assuming you have a DVD-burning application installed, the burning process should begin when you click the Backup button from Step 2.
 
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