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Cosine and Sine graphs

  1. May 8, 2006 #1
    this is my question:
    A Building sways 55cm to the right from origin in 5 seconds and 55 cm to the left of the origin in 35 seconds. And i am supposed to write an eqaution to define this.

    I'm guessing the is no amplitude no vertical translation and since it's sine basically im gonna need some help...

    Does anyone have any resources of GOOOD LIABLE EASY TO FOLLOW MATH SKILLS? My book Nelson Mathematics 11 with the rollercoaster in the front has a bunch of errors and misconceptions.
  2. jcsd
  3. May 8, 2006 #2
    Do you mean reliable?(not sure how liable comes into play)

    What concepts are you looking for and maybe we can show you a link to one online. Also see what your book says and maybe it is actually correct and you aren't grasping the concept.

    I find it unlikely that your instructor would give you a book with multiple errors and "misconceptions".
  4. May 9, 2006 #3
    It's a very weird question. I think you are looking for rotational kinematics here, as there is no translational motion. Why don't you express angular displacement as a function of time? In any case, the question seems too imprecise and vaugue to be a physics question to me.
  5. May 9, 2006 #4
    First off its supposed to be solved using trigonometry and i figured out the question to today. Please note Key words like "guessing".
  6. May 9, 2006 #5


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    I'm not sure I'm clear on what you're saying. You definitely have an amplitude - 55 cm. You also have 30 seconds between the positive peak and negative peak (which is which depends on whether you decide 'right' is positive or negative). You also have a phase shift, since the building should sway left and right at the same rate.
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