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Cosine of a vector.

  1. Feb 6, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    The cosine of a vector is equal to the opposite over its magnitude.

    2. Relevant equations

    The attempt at a solution[/b] the cosine is the ratio of the adjacent to the hypothenuse this is why i say it "came' is incorrect.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2014 #2

    haruspex

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    What exactly was the original question?
     
  4. Feb 7, 2014 #3
    That is the ?,its a true or false
     
  5. Feb 7, 2014 #4

    NascentOxygen

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    What statement is true or false?

    Oh, I see. It's this statement that's being questioned:
    Yes, it's an incorrect statement, as you pointed out.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2014
  6. Feb 7, 2014 #5

    If the cosine of a vector is its y component over its magnitude?
     
  7. Feb 7, 2014 #6

    NascentOxygen

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    It's not the vector which has a cosine. It's only angles which have cosines.
     
  8. Feb 7, 2014 #7

    HallsofIvy

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    If this really is the statement, I would not say it was either "true" or "false". I would just say it is non-sense! The function "cosine" is not [g]defined[/b] for vectors, only for angles or numbers. Further, saying "the opposite" is non-sense. "Opposite" is an adjective not a noun and cannot take the article "the".

     
  9. Feb 7, 2014 #8

    vela

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    Just out of curiosity, what is
    supposed to mean?
     
  10. Feb 7, 2014 #9

    NascentOxygen

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    cosine = adjacent ÷ magnitude ?
     
  11. Feb 7, 2014 #10

    vela

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    Wouldn't that be correct?
     
  12. Feb 7, 2014 #11

    NascentOxygen

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    Clearly, OP is a little confused.
     
  13. Feb 7, 2014 #12
    cosine


    The question was asking whether the statement ' cosine means the y component of a vector over its magnitude'.
    Is this true or false?
     
  14. Feb 7, 2014 #13

    NascentOxygen

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    Definitely false.
     
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