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Could Sirius A/B go supernova?

  1. Mar 22, 2007 #1
    I understand that main sequence/white-dwarf binary systems are the cause of type Ia supernovae. Is it possible that the Sirius A/B system could go supernova? The white dwarf, Sirius B, is an unusually large dwarf, about 1 solar-mass. While Sirius A is a 2.1 solar-mass main sequence star. The orbital radius is rather large, about 20au. So it seems there would be no ability of material to be sucked from A to B to make it go supernova. But some seem to think that there is another body in orbit with them that has perturbed Sirius B in the past. What would happen if this caused Sirius B to fall into Sirius A? Would there be a supernova in that case? Thanks.
     
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  3. Mar 24, 2007 #2

    Astronuc

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  4. Mar 24, 2007 #3
    Does anyone know where Sirius B is right now in relation to Sirius A? Is B at present visibly orbiting away from A? Or is it eclipsing, or headed into A? Thanks.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2007 #4

    Astronuc

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  6. Apr 2, 2007 #5

    Chronos

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    Unlikely Sirius B will go SNIa. SN1a's progenitor stars are believed to be white dwarfs - which Sirius B is. The fuel source is believed to be a red giant companion star - which Sirius A is not. Albeit Sirius A will likely [not soon enough to worry about] evolve into one. The other factor is distance. It appears Sirius B is too distant from its future RG companion to accrete mass in the manner believed necessary to put on a really big show:

    http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/ask/a11207.html
     
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