Could the brain be a quantum computer already?

In summary: MillerIn summary, the conversation discusses a new theory on how the brain and memory work, suggesting that the brain may send an advance wave back in time to remember something and then send the information back to the present in a "retarded wave." This could explain experiences like deja vu and the possibility of parallel universes. However, others in the conversation bring up counterpoints such as the imperfection of memories and the role of our bodies in our existence. The conversation also touches on the concept of jamais vu, which is the opposite of deja vu.
  • #1
KOLYA K
3
0
I have been thinking for the past week on how the mind works, and classical physics theory has plenty of holes in it.

The most convincing aspect of my new theory is with how the brain and memory work. When you wish to remember something, could the brain and its neurons be sending an advance wave back in time to the correct moment, then back in time the brain unconciously sends the information in a retarded wave back to you. It would explain why some memories can seem so real, like you are re-living the experience. It would also explain why generally the further back in time you wish to remember the longer it takes to remember the event in general due to the speed of light limit of the retarded wave, and why sometimes the memory 'pops' into your head after you have given up trying to remember, with C putting a lower limit on the time it takes to complete the collapse of the wave function. If you had recently remembered that thing, the advance wave may not have to go back in time as much.

The theory could explain classic experiences such as de-ja-vu, your mind receiving an advance wave from yourself in the future.
Could our brains already be real time machines?

I would appreciate some feedback on this as I am fairly new to the subject, with my background so far being in classical physics and mathematics.
All the best everyone.
Kolya Kamenev.
 
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  • #2
i think there is no doubt that our brains are linked to the dimensions in time, in fact, we may not even be looking at our future selves, but 'parrallel universes' in which at the moment we had first seen the images, we were actually observing the event ourselves
 
  • #3
KOLYA K said:
It would explain why some memories can seem so real, like you are re-living the experience.

it seems to me here that you are referring to the phenomenon of deja vu. researchers have discovered that deja vu is caused by an unconscious registering of information which, when you become consciously aware of, seems familiar since the brain has already registered it as a memory (i.e. you see someone in your peripheral vision without directly being aware of them and when you do see them, your brain has already registered them as a memory so it seems as if they/the situation is very familiar). either that, or the deja vu is triggered by a past memory that is similar to the situation that you have just seen.
 
  • #4
noblesavage8 said:
it seems to me here that you are referring to the phenomenon of deja vu. researchers have discovered that deja vu is caused by an unconscious registering of information which, when you become consciously aware of, seems familiar since the brain has already registered it as a memory (i.e. you see someone in your peripheral vision without directly being aware of them and when you do see them, your brain has already registered them as a memory so it seems as if they/the situation is very familiar). either that, or the deja vu is triggered by a past memory that is similar to the situation that you have just seen.

i can't believe that, as some memories are quite definately real, if you recognise somebody, you recognise sombody, you do not remember every event in an approx. 5 second period
 
  • #5
hexhunter said:
in fact, we may not even be looking at our future selves, but 'parrallel universes'

If the brain has connectivity to parallel universes (and I think it might), then this may justify the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

juju
 
  • #6
well, wouldn't that mean that memories would be perfect? Which, in fact they are not. We often tend to replace objects with different objects and fill in missing information when we access our memories. Also, how would you measure the distance between the memory in the past and future? Also, how do you explain memory loss etc...
 
  • #7
much like time, we know it's there, we have some control in what happens, but we can't see it all, its hiding behind the sofa of mystery
and of course, some people do have photographic memory
also, do not think that our bodies are on our side, their not keeping us alive for our own sake, much more likely for the sake of the bacterium we carry, we exist as giant vehicles for tiny beings, what we don't know, we probably don't have to know, as long as we do our job, what we forget is not important to the cause of our existence, if we remember a place but can't remember where it is or its name, then we won't be able to go back, wasting time for the bacterium that wishes to spread...

do i sound mad?
 
  • #8
hexhunter said:
do i sound mad?

yes, I think you do
 
  • #9
hexhunter said:
i can't believe that, as some memories are quite definately real, if you recognise somebody, you recognise sombody, you do not remember every event in an approx. 5 second period

...actually. there's also jamais vu. which is when you DO recognize somebody but you refuse to believe that you've met. essentially the opposite of deja vu...
 
  • #10
This thread is the sort of overspeculation that is prohibited in our Site Guidelines. Please take note in the future.

Thank you,

Tom
 

Related to Could the brain be a quantum computer already?

1. What is a quantum computer?

A quantum computer is a type of computer that uses quantum mechanics, the principles that govern the behavior of particles at the subatomic level, to perform calculations. Unlike classical computers that use bits (0s and 1s) to store and process information, quantum computers use quantum bits or qubits which can exist in multiple states at once, allowing for much more complex and efficient calculations.

2. How is the brain similar to a quantum computer?

The brain, like a quantum computer, processes information using complex networks of interconnected units (neurons for the brain and qubits for quantum computers). The brain also exhibits phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, which are key aspects of quantum computing. However, the exact mechanisms by which the brain processes information are still not fully understood and may not necessarily be quantum in nature.

3. Are there any scientific studies that support the idea of the brain being a quantum computer?

While there have been some studies that suggest certain aspects of brain function may have quantum origins, the majority of research does not support the idea that the brain functions as a quantum computer. Additionally, the brain is highly complex and it is unlikely that a single mechanism can fully explain its capabilities.

4. What implications would a quantum brain have?

If the brain were to function as a quantum computer, it would have significant implications for our understanding of consciousness, decision-making, and the nature of reality itself. It could also lead to advancements in brain-computer interfaces and artificial intelligence.

5. Can we build a quantum computer model of the brain?

Currently, our understanding of the brain and quantum computing is not advanced enough to build a complete and accurate model of a quantum brain. However, some researchers are exploring the idea of using quantum computers to simulate brain functions, which could potentially lead to a better understanding of the brain's complex processes.

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