Coulomb's law

  • Thread starter Ahsan123
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  • #1
Ahsan123
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I was reading my physics books. And then a question came across my mind.
Now here the the definition of coulomb. Electric charge measured in units of coulombs. It takes about 6*10^18 electrons.

So the question is did the electric charge only consists of electrons.
 

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  • #2
Bystander
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Any charge carrier/charged particle.
 
  • #3
Doc Al
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So the question is did the electric charge only consists of electrons.
No, it doesn't have to be electrons. A Coulomb equals the magnitude of the charge on that many elementary charges, which may be negative (like electrons) or positive (like protons).
 
  • #4
ZealScience
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When the unit is defined, the electrons were not even discovered. Therefore, it highly likely not. In fact, in modern physics, electric charges are associated with particles that interact with EM fields which have a whole family of them.
 

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