1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Crazy Squirrel

  1. Sep 16, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A [​IMG] has x- and y-coordinates ( 1.2 m, 3.9 m) at time t1=0 and coordinates ( 5.5 m, -0.60 m) at time t2 = 3.1 s.

    For this time interval, find the x & y component of the average velocity.
    Express your answer using two significant figures.





    3. The attempt at a solution

    This is what I did
    First I drew how I would imagine it would look like.

    Then I decided xf-xi / tf-ti = vax

    -.60 - 1.2 /3.1 = -1.8/3.1 = -.580
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2007 #2

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    but -0.60 is y2, not x2...
     
  4. Sep 16, 2007 #3
    ok

    my mistake (obviously) :P

    5.5 - 1.2 /3.1 = 4.3/3.1 = 1.38
     
  5. Sep 16, 2007 #4

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Yeah, that looks right. Do the same for vy. The question asks for 2 significant figures though...
     
  6. Sep 16, 2007 #5
    Ok I did the other questions regarding this crazy squirrel,

    but this question got me

    Find the direction of the average velocity. below the x axis.

    I graphed it.

    x com = 1.4
    y com = -1.5

    arc tan of (-1.5/1.4) = -.82

    why is this wrong.?
     
  7. Sep 16, 2007 #6

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Is that in radians? Does the question ask for degrees or radians?

    Although the first parts asked for the answer in 2 significant figures... you should keep more decimal places for the next calculations...

    ie: use arctan( -1.4516/1.387)
     
  8. Sep 16, 2007 #7
    since it still says use two sigs

    I did what you mentioned above and I got

    -.8081519332

    so I rounded to

    -.81

    still wrong.

    and yes in degrees
     
  9. Sep 16, 2007 #8

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    But -0.81 is in the answer in radians... do you have the calculator set up for degrees? What is the anwer in degrees?
     
  10. Sep 16, 2007 #9
    haha, I guess that is what I get for using my graphing calc, I forgot the last time I used it I set it up for radians. Thank you for your explation. :)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Crazy Squirrel
  1. This problem is crazy (Replies: 1)

  2. Crazy problems (Replies: 7)

  3. Crazy Ammeter (Replies: 2)

Loading...