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Crazy thought

  1. Apr 25, 2006 #1

    wolram

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    Has any one thought what physics would be like if, matter and the vacuum
    were inverted, ie the stars planets ect are (holes) in the (solid) vacuum,
    and these holes can travel the solid like bubbles in water ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 25, 2006 #2

    -Job-

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    Let me join this experiment. If we tried to model matter as bubbles floating around in the water of vaccum, then would the vaccum exert pressure on the matter? If so would this affect the behavior of matter in any way? Such an object should be under the same pressure from any direction, unless there is an object nearby blocking off some of that pressure, in which case the opposing pressure wins and the objects come together. This i think is equivalent to Lesage's theory of gravity. Your universe now has a form of gravity. :smile:
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2006
  4. Apr 25, 2006 #3

    wolram

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    Very intuitive job, i will have to look up Lessage.
     
  5. Apr 25, 2006 #4

    wolram

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    Last edited: Apr 25, 2006
  6. Apr 25, 2006 #5

    wolram

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    So what is (wrong) with Le Sages theory, it seems it did not fall out of
    focus until the 1960s, so it must have had some good points.
     
  7. Apr 25, 2006 #6

    -Job-

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    I think it has problems dealing with the fact that "energy gravitates, possesses inertia and is a source of gravitation". One challenge this generates, according to the link you posted:
    According to that link, Maxwell and Poincare noted that:
    Also, in order to work, Lesage particles would have to propagate at super-liminal speeds:
    The biggest problem with Lesage's theory is that it has to compete with Relativity.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2006
  8. Apr 26, 2006 #7

    Chronos

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    A big problem indeed. Some, myself included, would say fatal.
     
  9. Apr 26, 2006 #8

    wolram

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    Thanks Job, i guess GR wins this time.
     
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