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Cuba Starting to De-Socialize

  1. Apr 4, 2008 #1

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Good news, but it also highlights some of the issues that we don't hear much about, wrt how rough Cubans really have it. Of particular interest is that the country uses two separate currencies, one for the ruling class (which is "hard" currency, ie, real money) and one for the poor that is worth 1/24th what the ruling class's currency is.
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-04-03-cuba_N.htm
    http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/americas/04/02/cuba.freedoms/index.html?iref=newssearch

    They have a long way to go, but it's a start. Whether it is a sign of more substantive changes to come is still an open question, though.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2008 #2
    I visited the PRC in 1990 and there was a two tier system there too. One for locals and one for tourists like me. The locals weren't forbidden to buy things, they paid less for them. I thought it made a lot of sense in my case. I gladly paid the higher price for museum entrance fees since they were still very cheap by American standards. But the locals were paying pennies to get in. In the name of 'fairness' either they would have to charge me pennies too, or price the thing out of range of the locals.
     
  4. Apr 5, 2008 #3

    Art

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    Crocodile Tears

    Do you think their hardships might be somehow related to the US trade embargo imposed since 1960 :rolleyes:

    No doubt as you are so concerned by their plight you have been actively campaigning to have the embargo lifted or then again perhaps not?

    To refresh your memory on how Cuba became a socialist state I'll quote myself from an earlier thread,

     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2008
  5. Apr 5, 2008 #4

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Could be. Could also be due to the oppression of their government. Afterall, their problems aren't substantially different from those that plagued Russians during the USSR years. And Cuba does, of course, have quite a healthy tourist market for Europeans that provides a steady stream of income for the people who are allowed to have real income.
    I'm in favor of lifting the embargo in exchange for Castro II's continued de-socialization. But campaigning? Me? No.
    How it happened really isn't relevant to where they are now. The point is they are in a bad place now and need to fix it.
     
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