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Current control

  1. Aug 18, 2004 #1

    enigma

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    I'm working with a device which is basically an AC L-R circuit.

    The device I have hooked up to the voltage supply which I was informed was a 'current regulator' is only maintaining a constant voltage. This results in a trickle of current to flow through at high frequencies.

    I need to find a way to keep a constant RMS current running through the solenoid (I need a relatively constant P-P magnetic field strength) while the frequency of the AC current varies from one to several thousand Hz. Discrete increments may be OK, but a dynamically varying capacitance would be optimal.

    I know they have these devices, because the power companies have capacitor banks attached to power poles. What I don't know is what they are actually called, whether they are dynamic or discrete, how much they cost, and if it's easier to buy them or make one.

    Any information would be helpful.

    -thanks
     
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  3. Aug 18, 2004 #2

    chroot

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    Hmm.. I find myself wondering if a current mirror can operate in AC... lemme think about this.

    - Warren
     
  4. Aug 18, 2004 #3

    enigma

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    My preliminary thoughts are to somehow link up a bunch of L-C tank circuits with different resonances hooked up to (in sequence) inverters, an RC with low resistances, and then transistors which would turn on and off capacitors for the main LRC.

    EDIT: I am concerned with this one that the transistors will get cooked if operated in 100V AC

    Another option might be to simply size a capacitor to provide at least the required current at the voltage limit over a wide enough operating band (with the very low frequencies clipped, obviously). Then somehow shunt the current if it exceeds the peak level. This won't result in a clean sine wave, but I think I can deal with that since the material we're testing will be reaching saturation levels before the field hits full strength anyway.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2004
  5. Aug 20, 2004 #4

    enigma

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    *bump*

    Anyone have any comments or ideas here?
     
  6. Aug 20, 2004 #5

    chroot

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    Can you give me some specifics to work with? How much current do you need? What frequency? How much impedance will the coil have at its worst frequency?

    - Warren
     
  7. Aug 20, 2004 #6

    enigma

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    The current will not be more than 2 Amps, and will most likely be quite a bit less.
    Frequency will range between 1 and 5000Hz
    The current coil's inductance is in the 10 milliHenry range, although that may change a bit (no more than by 10^(+-1)).
    The resistance of the coil is ~9 ohms, but again that may change if we wind a new one.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2004
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