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Current in Series

  1. Feb 6, 2016 #1
    hey, sir i have a question why the current remain same in series combination of resistance?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 6, 2016 #2

    QuantumQuest

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    As you apply a voltage to the two resistors in series, electric current path is through the first and then the second resistor and then back to the voltage source. So effectively, according to Ohm's law: I = V/(R1 + R2) and the total current flowing in the circuit, is given by previous relation.So, it is the same for both of resistors.
     
  4. Feb 6, 2016 #3

    anorlunda

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    Your question is not stated correctly. "remain same" compared to what?
     
  5. Feb 6, 2016 #4
    sorry sir
     
  6. Feb 6, 2016 #5
    thanks sir what about voltage in parallel?
     
  7. Feb 6, 2016 #6

    QuantumQuest

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    Now, you can figure out this your own, using a similar logic to the first question: what is changing and what remains constant regarding each resistor?
     
  8. Feb 6, 2016 #7
    in series voltage change but current constant
     
  9. Feb 6, 2016 #8
  10. Feb 6, 2016 #9
    please sir clear my Confusion
     
  11. Feb 6, 2016 #10

    phinds

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    That's VERY hard to do since your statements and questions are completely unclear. Draw a circuit diagram of a circuit that confuses you and let's talk about it.
     
  12. Feb 7, 2016 #11
    my question is
    why voltage remain constant in parallel circuit?
     
  13. Feb 7, 2016 #12

    cnh1995

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    What is your understanding of voltage?
     
  14. Feb 7, 2016 #13
    work done to bring charge
     
  15. Feb 7, 2016 #14
    or it is the energy that provide source to move charge
     
  16. Feb 7, 2016 #15

    cnh1995

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    Those are vague definitions. How do you measure voltage experimentally?
     
  17. Feb 7, 2016 #16

    cnh1995

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    What I want to emphasize is the nature of current and voltage. Current flows "through" a component and voltage is developed "across" a component. Now can you answer your own question?
     
  18. Feb 7, 2016 #17
    By connecting a voltmeter parallel with circuit
     
  19. Feb 7, 2016 #18
    littlle bit confusion
     
  20. Feb 7, 2016 #19
    mean in parallel component are connected with same point and in series are different
     
  21. Feb 7, 2016 #20
    so in series current is constant and in parallel voltage
     
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