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Dark Matter Black Holes

  1. Sep 13, 2010 #1
    Hello fellow Cosmology fans and professionals!

    Does Dark Matter form into Black Holes, and do regular Black Holes attract and trap Dark Matter? Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 13, 2010 #2

    nicksauce

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    Dark matter interacts gravitationally the same as normal matter, so the answer would be, in principle, yes, although in practice, most dark matter is in the halo of galaxies, not the centre, and most of the black holes would be in the centre of galaxies.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2010 #3
    Great! Thanks for the answer nicksauce.

    [That also means that the dark matter will never escape, right? don't want to get ahead of myself]

    I could only assume so, but i couldn't help thinking that means there might be an opportunity to capture evidence of, or to actually "see" dark matter falling into a black hole, if it were clumped enough. Perhaps the gravity waves or even unexpected radiation. Right?

    Now if the answer is, 'dark matter has no reason to clump', so no, then it has to be real matter that is shaping the dark matter, and not the other way around. right? If not then why is dark matter even slightly clumped at all?

    Incidentally - if Dark Matter particles can pass through one another then i don't suppose dark matter has any even temperate that would follow Thermodynamics. Every particle would maintain the momentum it started with. Right? [This is not taking real matter in the universe that does influence momentum of Dark Matter into account, of coarse. Right?]
    Either way the average of momentums must be really high [hot] or they would settle into clumps i guess.


    If so then what is the distribution of momentums, all the same momentum, or a random or patterned range? normal matter would eventually randomize the momentums around an average. Right?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2010
  5. Nov 14, 2011 #4
    Observing liquid vortex we found it generating and spreading outgoing double spiral waves. he double spiral wave generation was induced by the asymmetric funnel bottom most of the time shaped as a 8-like dipole. This spinning 8-like profile carved the funnel bottom generating outgoing double spiral wave propagating away from the vortex funnel. If black holes are vortexes following the same behavior than there going to be a similar phenomenon of spiral wave generation, in this case gravitational waves, propagating away from the Black Hole along the space time fabric. Spiral waves transfer momentum to the mass objects on their way, which could be also interpreted as a repulsion force. If the wave amplitude dissipates faster than static gravitation, the distant masses will face dynamic gravitational repulsion rather than static gravitational attraction.
    Observing the water vortex we found the cause for asymmetric funnel shaping to appear as an intrinsic property of a vortex in general. If the spiral wave generation takes place for the Black Holes vortexes, than it could provide a natural explanation for the accelerated Universe expansion: static gravitational attraction at short range is over-dominated with dynamic repulsion at long range.

    Best,
    YG
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2011
  6. Nov 22, 2011 #5
    Hi, I've observed a misprint in my posting. The idea supposed to be formulated as following: "If the wave amplitude dissipates SLOWER (YG- my correction) than static gravitation, the distant masses will face dynamic gravitational repulsion rather than static gravitational attraction.".
     
  7. Nov 22, 2011 #6

    Chronos

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    Dark matter is generally not absorbed by black holes, so its contribution to the mass of dark holes is negligible. See http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=358 [Broken] for discussion.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
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