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Dark matter fills 'empty' space

  1. May 19, 2014 #1
    There is now evidence dark matter fills what would otherwise be considered to be empty space.

    'Cosmologists at Penn Weigh Cosmic Filaments and Voids'
    http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/cosmologists-penn-weigh-cosmic-filaments-and-voids

    "Dark matter ... permeate all the way to the center of the voids."

    '"No Empty Space in the Universe" --Dark Matter Discovered to Fill Intergalactic Space'
    http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblo...-discovered-to-fill-intergalactic-space-.html

    "A long standing mystery on where the missing dark matter is has been solved by the research. There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter."

    In the following article the dark matter which fills 'empty' space is displaced by the particles of matter which exist in it and move through it.

    'Comment on the higher derivative Lagrangians in relativistic theory'
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.5759

    "Einstein theory of gravitational fields and this gives a new perspective on the Mach principle revisiting the “absolute” acceleration concept as a natural motion in space-time deformed by the matter-energy contained therein. We refer the reader to the paper of Einstein on a related topic [9]. The relativistic theory of an Aether was discussed several time, see for e.g. [8], [9]. In this paper, our hypothesis is different and gives a relativistic theory of the deformation of continuous media (for which the geometry is described by the metric field)."

    Any chance the Milky Way's halo is the deformation of continuous media?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 19, 2014 #2
    .
    Lets get to the heart of your posts, which applies to how geometry is described in cosmology. First off space geometry can be thought of as a mathematical representation of relations. What is the mathematical relation between A and B. Does that relation have a range? a direction? how much influence? and approximate shape?
    In cosmology those relations is essentially the relations between gravity, whose contributors is Non baryonic matter (Dark matter), baryonic matter (normal matter), radiation. These together have a positive energy-density that corresponds to a positive pressure via equations of state.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equation_of_state_(cosmology)

    now the cosmological constant which is often referred to as dark energy is also a positive energy-density but its influence is negative pressure.

    So the deformations on a cosmology scale is the distribution curve between positive pressure (gravity) and negative pressure (cosmological constant.)
    It is true that every volume of space is filled with some form of energy density, even if it is that of a vacuum. However space is simply volume filled with the energy/mass of the universe. In and of itself space has no other properties other than volume.

    http://cosmology101.wikidot.com/universe-geometry page two of this article is
    http://cosmology101.wikidot.com/geometry-flrw-metric/

    if you think about it the wave function of electricity is also a mathematical descriptive of its region,amount of influence and direction of influences, cosmology applications is much the same.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2014
  4. May 19, 2014 #3
    Which is exactly what the first two articles I linked to are stating is not the case.

    The second article says, "There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter."

    The third article I referred to then goes on to refer to the "deformation of continuous media".

    If another way to refer to the deformation of continuous media is the state of displacement of the dark matter which fills 'empty' space then the state of displacement of the dark matter is the positive pressure (gravity).
     
  5. May 20, 2014 #4
    no your misinterpreting what those articles are saying. They are saying we can't see dark matter, they reside mainly in the voids between baryonic matter.

    they are simply pointing that what people think of as matter is baryonic (visible matter), dark matter however is not visible and therefore what people think of as empty space isn't. Thats all they are describing

    you really need to be careful of pop media literature they often misrepresent concepts in their descriptive's. Deformation of space I already explained

    dark matter is the largest contributor of gravity, on cosmological scales.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2014
  6. May 20, 2014 #5
    You are completely missing the point of the articles. The article says, "There is no empty space in the universe."

    You are interpreting "There is no empty space in the universe" as there is empty space in the universe.

    You are completely missing the point of this topic. The point of this topic is assuming you are capable of correctly understanding "There is no empty space in the universe" means there is no empty space in the Universe then what does that mean in terms of particles of matter's interaction with the dark matter?

    The third article I posted refers to the interaction of particles of matter and the dark matter as "the deformation of continuous media".

    The question I am asking is, is "the deformation of continuous media" physical evidence of curved spacetime?

    Is "the deformation of continuous media" what you referred to as "the positive pressure (gravity)"?
     
  7. May 20, 2014 #6
    your right there is no empty space, its filled with the contents of the universe, please pay attention
     
  8. May 20, 2014 #7
    You are right there is no empty space, it is filled with dark matter, please pay attention. That's what "There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter" means.
     
  9. May 20, 2014 #8
    dark matter is not a form of eather, there is no eather. dark matter has its own distribution density.
    Space is not a substance it is simply volume. That volume is filled with the energy/mass contents of the universe. Not every cubic meter of space will have dark matter in it
     
  10. May 20, 2014 #9
    Attempting to get back to our regularly scheduled programming...

    Assuming you are someone reading this topic who is capable of understanding "There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter" means exactly what it says which is dark matter fills what would otherwise be considered to be 'empty' space where the third article I linked to is correct and matter deforms the dark matter, is the deformation of the dark matter physical evidence of curved spacetime?
     
  11. May 20, 2014 #10
    actually the third article you linked has nothing to do with dark matter it has to do with ether theory
     
  12. May 20, 2014 #11

    Chronos

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    How does this explain dark matter 'clumps' that produce gravitational lensing?
     
  13. May 20, 2014 #12
    Actually the third articles says, "The relativistic theory of an Aether was discussed several time, see for e.g. [8], [9]. In this paper, our hypothesis is different and gives a relativistic theory of the deformation of continuous media (for which the geometry is described by the metric field)."

    Now, if you were capable of understanding "There is no empty space in the universe. The intergalactic space is filled with dark matter" means exactly what it says it means which is dark matter fills what would otherwise be considered to empty space, then you might be able to understand the third article does not have to do with aether theory as "[their] hypothesis is different" as it refers to the deformation of continuous media.

    Now, assuming you were capable of understanding what this topic is all about, the question then is, if the media is the dark matter which fills 'empty' space then is the deformation of the dark matter physical evidence of curved spacetime?
     
  14. May 20, 2014 #13

    phinds

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    Clearly, the people who have responded do understand EXACTLY what you are contending and they (and I) are disagreeing with it because it is wrong.

    As Mordred pointed out, there is space which does not have any dark matter in it.
     
  15. May 20, 2014 #14
    that article is discussing field relations, I give up believe what you want
     
  16. May 20, 2014 #15
    The dark matter 'clumps' is the state of displacement of the dark matter.

    The Milky Way's halo is not a clump of dark matter traveling along with the matter the Milky Way consists of. The Milky Way's halo is the state of displacement of the dark matter the matter the Milky Way consists of is moving through and displacing.

    'Offset between dark matter and ordinary matter: evidence from a sample of 38 lensing clusters of galaxies'
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.1475

    "Our data strongly support the idea that the gravitational potential in clusters is mainly due to a non-baryonic fluid, and any exotic field in gravitational theory must resemble that of CDM fields very closely."

    The offset is due to the galaxy clusters moving through the dark matter. The analogy is a submarine moving through the water. You are under water. Two miles away from you are many lights. Moving between you and the lights one mile away is a submarine. The submarine displaces the water. The state of displacement of the water causes the center of the lensing of the light propagating through the water to be offset from the center of the submarine itself. The offset between the center of the lensing of the light propagating through the water displaced by the submarine and the center of the submarine itself is going to remain the same as the submarine moves through the water. The submarine continually displaces different regions of the water. The state of the water connected to and neighboring the submarine remains the same as the submarine moves through the water even though it is not the same water the submarine continually displaces. This is what is occurring as the galaxy clusters move through and displace the dark matter.

    'The Milky Way's dark matter halo appears to be lopsided'
    http://arxiv.org/abs/0903.3802

    "The emerging picture of the asymmetric dark matter halo is supported by the \Lambda CDM halos formed in the cosmological N-body simulation."

    The Milky Way's dark matter halo is lopsided due to the matter in the Milky Way moving through and displacing the dark matter.

    What is referred to in the third article as the deformation of continuous media is the state of displacement of the dark matter.

    If the three articles I linked to are correct then is the state of displacement of the dark matter physical evidence of curved spacetime?

    If the Milky Way's halo is the state of displacement of the dark matter then is the Milky Way's halo physical evidence of curved spacetime?
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2014
  17. May 20, 2014 #16
    Which is exactly what the first two articles I linked to are saying is not the case. That's what "there is no empty space in the universe" means.
     
  18. May 20, 2014 #17
    you can have localized regions of space whose energy-density is effectively zero. Meaning no dark matter. Energy-density is the key to what your missing. Localized GR calculations do not need to explain dark matter or dark energy as its localized influence is negligible. The only influence they need to worry about for say a stars gravitational influence is the matter of the star itself.
     
  19. May 20, 2014 #18
    Which is exactly what the first two articles I linked to are saying is not the case. That's what "there is no empty space in the universe" means. The articles are stating, as far as we know, there is no space which does not consist of dark matter or particles of matter.

    The title of the article:

    '"No Empty Space in the Universe" --Dark Matter Discovered to Fill Intergalactic Space'

    From the article:

    "there is no empty space"

    "intergalactic space is filled with dark matter."
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2014
  20. May 20, 2014 #19
    I have already pointed out that, that is NOT what those articles are saying, That is how you interpreted those articles and it is wrong
     
  21. May 20, 2014 #20
    I have already pointed out that, that IS what those articles are saying. That how you interpreted those articles is incorrect.
     
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