Deadline approaching fast, undegrad Waterloo Physics or Queens Engineering Physics

  • #1
I have until June 1st/2nd to decide my university

I am still torn between engineering and science, though I am leaning towards science (if I had to choose one).

With Waterloo physics, I could use the co-op system as a way to gain some (hopefully paid) research experience and then go on to grad school (I feel like grad school is almost a must if I go the science route).

With Queens Engineering Physics, I can learn more about each eng in 1st year (you declare your eng major in 2nd year). Also, I have the option to pursue physics in grad school, but it isn't a must as I can fall back on the engineering degree if I change my mind about a science career. However, its co-op program is one year-long term, while Waterloo has 4-6 four month terms (Waterloo's would give me more varied experiences in different careers and positions).

As a wildcard, I am also considering UBC science because I can transfer to its Engineering Physics program in my 2nd year. Its co-op system is similar to Waterloo's. Distance from home is a factor preventing me from seriously considering it though.


Is anyone familiar with these schools/programs and can anyone give me advice on what to do?
Is it better to keep my options open with an Engineering Physics degree or should I just commit to Physics (what I'm leaning towards) and do well enough to make it into and through grad school?

Help is appreciated, Thanks
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Hey, I'm kind of thinking the same thing, only with Mcgill physics isntead of waterloo. But, from what I've researched, its easier to transfer from engineering to science (especially from engineering pphysics) than it is from sciences. And from what people tell me, its usually better to get a professional degree (ie engineering) than a non professional. That said, queens co-op is inferior to waterloo's, but you do have oppertunity to find work independantly during the summers (this way the uni doesnt take a % from you either)

Thats pretty much what I concluded.
 
  • #3
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But, from what I've researched, its easier to transfer from engineering to science (especially from engineering pphysics) than it is from sciences.

At the undergrad level, and only in the first couple (one?) years.

I started in engineering and after the first year decided to stick with physics. I didn't have to make up any classes because the first year of engineering at my school was the same as first year science, plus four more classes.

If I had done just the first year science, I would have had to make up the engineering classes if I wanted to switch to engineering.
 
  • #4
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I'd go with Queens Eng. Phys. You're going to take many upper level physics courses (ie. a couple QM courses), you can still go to graduate school in physics if you wish after graduation. You'll be eligible to become a professional engineer. If I were you the only way I'd go with Waterloo physics is if I was dead set on academia (which is probably not a good thing). The waterloo co-op program is really not as good as you think. A lot of their students get employed by the university. For example, when I visited the engineering department the guy who gave me a tour was actually on his co-op term just doing random **** for the department.
 

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