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DeBroglie wavelength

  1. Apr 19, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Find the de Broglie wavelength of a 7.0 eV electron.


    2. Relevant equations
    de Broglie wavelength = h/p = h/(mv)
    Photoelectric effect equation (not 100% sure)



    3. The attempt at a solution
    i need to solve for v in de Broglie's equation so i can find the wavelength. i know the mass of the electron is 9.11x10^-31kg, i know that h is Plancks constant, and i know that the work function = 7.0 x (1.602x10^-19 J) BUT how can i find v?

    I tried to find v by using the photoelectric effect equation but i didnt get a correct answer:
    hf = KE + Work function....BUT how can i solve for v if i dont have the frequency!?
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 19, 2007 #2

    Dick

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    The energy of the electron is just given by E=(1/2)*m*v^2 (no need for relativity here). Does that help?
     
  4. Apr 19, 2007 #3
    Dick -
    i wish i could tell you that it makes perfect sense now, but i'm still a bit confused here. When you say no relativity what exactly does that mean?
     
  5. Apr 19, 2007 #4

    Dick

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    I mean the energy is low enough that the speed of the electron is much less than that of light. So I can use the nonrelativistic formula KE=(1/2)*m*v^2. Sorry to hear you are still confused, but why not just set 7eV equal to (1/2)*m*v^2 to find v?
     
  6. Apr 19, 2007 #5
    well...i guess because i dont understand how the work function can just be set to equal the kinetic energy. how is it that the hf can just be dropped from the photoelectric equation? I sure do wish my teacher would have spent some more time on this stuff - it seems like he just left out half the info we need to complete this assignment.
     
  7. Apr 19, 2007 #6
    Ok, i got the right answer but i only understand about 90% of what i did to get it. According the Photo. effect:
    h*f - W = KE ....so then h*f - W = (1/2)mv^2
    I guess my only question is where did the h and f disappear to?
     
  8. Apr 19, 2007 #7

    Dick

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    Why do you think this is a photoelectric effect problem? There is no 'work function'. It's just a de Broglie wavelength problem.
     
  9. Apr 19, 2007 #8

    Dick

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    There's no h*f in the problem either.
     
  10. Apr 19, 2007 #9
    ok i see what you are saying. i guess because the only other place i have seen the eV is in the photoelectric effect problems. i have read my notes and the section in my book concerning the de Broglie Wavelength (which there were no examples problems given). consequently, i am having a tough time figuring out how to work them. The way i understand it P=mv, where v is the speed. i know KE = (1/2)mv^2. So in this instance KE = 7eV?
     
  11. Apr 19, 2007 #10

    Dick

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    Yes. In this case eV is just a unit of energy. I thought you were going to take a break.
     
  12. Apr 19, 2007 #11
    yes i am right now...
     
  13. Apr 19, 2007 #12

    Dick

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    Me too..........
     
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