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Deciding my future

  1. Nov 9, 2006 #1
    This is my last year in school (17 years old), so i was deciding my future with my dad and we fighted about my career when i told him that i want to study physics, and he sayd that you cant cause you will not earn money, and stuff like that.

    So he impose that i must study administration, lol (be a manager thats a crap). And i dont have the economical power to scape the house and study physic, so i was thinking studying administration (5 years), after that seek for a job, with the money of that job, will finance my studies in physic...

    What do you think...

    sorry for my bad english.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 9, 2006 #2
    how about you reach a compromise and do a dual degree with business and science or administration and physics (same difference?).

    If not tell your father engineers make heaps of money and study that. Then you get physics, maths and chem all in one hit.
     
  4. Nov 9, 2006 #3

    quasar987

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    Convince him that physicists earn money?
     
  5. Nov 9, 2006 #4

    radou

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    It is a typical thing that dads think physicists don't earn money. That's interesting.
     
  6. Nov 9, 2006 #5

    verty

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    Don't give up. Don't do what you don't want to do.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2006 #6
    Print him out an article which states how much physicists earn. They can earn a lot.
     
  8. Nov 9, 2006 #7
    How much does they earn?
     
  9. Nov 9, 2006 #8

    marcusl

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  10. Nov 9, 2006 #9

    marcusl

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  11. Nov 9, 2006 #10

    JasonRox

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    Plus, the salary levels for Business Administration is spiralling down because everyone thinks there is money in it, hence your dad thinks so too. Because of this, supply goes up! And if you know anything about business, when supply goes up for a job, salaries go down.

    It wouldn't surprise me if the salaries for Physicists have stayed consistent in the past 50 years (considering inflation) because it's not like all of the sudden there will be a flood of Physicists coming into the field. That would be great, but it's not going to happen.

    Note: When I transferred to university, my mom thought I was going into business. I didn't tell her it was for Mathematics. She didn't find out until half way through first year. Of course, she didn't and probably doesn't like that decision. I'm happy, so that's all that matters.
     
  12. Nov 9, 2006 #11
    Thanks alot guys, Now my emotional state had rised.

    Just another question; if a person is not too smart, can he finish a physic career?

    Cause we dont know our limits until we are in the middle of a career, rigth?
    Because in college the math and the physic is easy, and it is a hard decide.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2006
  13. Nov 9, 2006 #12
    What college?
     
  14. Nov 9, 2006 #13

    JasonRox

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    www.buyitonlinedegree-prestigiouscollege.com[/URL]

    DUH!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  15. Nov 9, 2006 #14
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  16. Nov 10, 2006 #15
    Thanks guys; I will study physic, my dad is an idiot (He doesnt know what he says) and talking about studing administration, i think that is too easy for a person who like science.

    ps: I think that i passed my transition period (I mean i have only 17 years old and it is hard for a young men to take decision without the understanding of this path).
     
  17. Nov 11, 2006 #16

    verty

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    I don't think it's about smartness more than skills. If you gain skills, you can use them whether you are smart or not. Smartness probably makes it easier to gain skills, or easier to gain them on your own without guidance, but once you have them, you have them.
     
  18. Nov 11, 2006 #17

    JasonRox

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    But then you're assuming that anyone can gain a skill, smart or not, which I disagree with.

    That's the reality. Not anyone can do Physics, however slow you go.
     
  19. Nov 11, 2006 #18

    verty

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    In the extreme, a disabled person typically can't learn to do hurdles, so some skills can't be learned, and perhaps some intellectual skills require some base level of intellect, but I think the hill is the learning of, not the having.
     
  20. Nov 11, 2006 #19
    In average how many people are studying physics in a university?
     
  21. Nov 11, 2006 #20
    very very few, an average large university may only have 20-50 majors entering every year.

    For instance NYU which has a population of 50,000 students and they only get about 30 physics majors every year.


    Also in the US high school physics teachers are in such high demand, that in some states you can get a free house, land, and a job right out of college. I believe the ratio of high school physics teachers to students is something on the order of 1:1000.
     
  22. Nov 11, 2006 #21
    It really depends on the university. Some universities have less than 20 per graduating class, some have over a hundred. It's probably more approriate to talk about the percentages.

    You can look all of this stuff up on school websites, and other websites such as collegeboard.com

    CPL.Luke, isn't NYU's student body like 35 thousand?
     
  23. Nov 11, 2006 #22
    Can you explain me whats the differece between TOEFL and SAT (I dont live in the United States of America but i want to there to study), and what books do you recommend to study for these tests.
     
  24. Nov 11, 2006 #23
    The SAT reasoning test is a standardized test which contains three categories:
    -Mathematics
    -Critical Reading
    -Writing

    You can learn more about the SAT on http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/about/SATI.html

    The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

    The difference between the SAT and TOEFL is that the SAT is aimed at students living in the United States, educated at an english speaking high school. The TOEFL is meant for those who are not absolutely fluent in the English language.

    Most US universities I know of require international students to take the SAT and TOEFL. If your critical reading and writing scores on the SAT are low, the TOEFL can off set that.

    Search www.google.com to learn more about these tests.

    It is probably in your best interest to take both tests.
     
  25. Nov 11, 2006 #24
    Quant shops (in finance) pay top phD physicists and mathematicians up to 1/2 million dollars to start. Yes, that is million. Aerospace companies (have to be a US citizen) will pay in the six figures for PhDs in physics and math and around $60-70,000 for BS. You won't starve if you are any good at physics and math.
     
  26. Nov 11, 2006 #25
    Ok -- I KNOW the ratio is low... but FREE house, land, etc? :surprised

    come-on. I was better paid as a grad student than as high school teacher of physics and chem at +30 master's credits pay scale (and both jobs were within the past 10 years). And buying supplies out of pocket.

    Yes -- things are improving... but I'd sure like to see which state is doing this. Yeah -- pay should scale with demand, but in this case I'd be surprised. Teachers are usually paid out of local/state moneys. What school board would approve this? AND still have supplies? May I kiss the board members' feet?:!!)
     
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