Deciding What To Do With Inherited Nude Sketch

  • Thread starter rhuthwaite
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation revolves around whether or not to keep a nude sketch by Walter Battis that the person inherited from their grandfather. The person and their family do not like the sketch and are considering selling or donating it. Some suggest waiting for the art market to boom and then selling it, while others suggest getting it professionally appraised and possibly loaning it to a museum or gallery. The artist is not well-known, but has a following in the African art community.
  • #1
rhuthwaite
62
2
Should I keep it??

I have recently inherited a nude sketch by Walter Battis. It is not a picture I really like and would never put it on my wall. No one in my family likes it either and we are trying to decide whether to keep it or not. Any ideas?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Well if no one likes it I don't see a reason to keep it unless it has family value(being passed down) or if its valuable. But in my opinion even if it was worth something and no one liked it, I wouldn't keep it. Just my opinion though
 
  • #3
Its of extreme value, could probably go in an art gallery or museum, but it also has a bit of family value (Walter Battis painted it for my grandfather who recently passed away)
 
  • #4
?

So, despite its extreme sentimental value, you still don't aesthetically "like" it, and are considering pitching it?

Does viewing it invoke happy thoughts of your grandfather? If so, there is no more noble thing that a piece of art can aspire to.
 
  • #5
If nobody likes or would want to display it, then perhaps it would be best if it were sold to someone who would enjoy it, or donated to a museum, if it's of such quality. I'm not one to keep things I don't enjoy, and if there are others who would enjoy it more, it just seems to be the right thing to do to allow it to be displayed someplace where others could enjoy it rather than just let it get dusty in storage somewhere.
 
  • #6
DaveC426913 said:
?

So, despite its extreme sentimental value, you still don't aesthetically "like" it, and are considering pitching it?

Does viewing it invoke happy thoughts of your grandfather? If so, there is no more noble thing that a piece of art can aspire to.

Wel I didn't have a close bond with my grandfather, he got psd after world war II and started drinking... then didn't stop drinking. He didn't even know who I was, even though I had met him numerous times. So can't say the picture invokes happy thoughts, more sad thoughts. He did leave me all the Punch books ever published which I will be keeping!
 
  • #7
If I were you, I would wait until the art market is booming and then sell it for a really high price.

My art Prof. was telling me about artists in the 80's that became big during the art boom, and then when it went back down all their stuff was worthless and sat in the basements of art galleries because no one wanted to display that junk.
 
  • #8
How do I find out when the art market is booming?
 
  • #9
Beats me, just keep an eye out for when the guy that made your work becomes really popular again. Show us a pic of it, I want to see it.
 
  • #10
Ok sure. Has anyone actually heard of him? Because I hadn't until the other day...
 
  • #11
I don't know much about art at all, and I've never heard of this guy. Until you mentioned your relationship (or lack thereof) with Gramps, I would have suggested hanging onto it for sentimental reasons. I'm horrible for that. In your situation, however, I'd first spring a few pesos to have it professionally appraised. Whatever it's worth, toss it onto eBay with that as a minimum bid (or reserve bid, which is secret). You could end up getting 10 or more times what it's worth if a bidding war starts up.
If that's too crass, look into Sobey's.
 
  • #12
If you're not sure about selling it yet, consider loaning it to a museum or art gallery. You can always sell it later, and might even get a few offers if your name is displayed as the owner.

Plus their insurance should cover it for you in case of loss or damage (although I'd get that in writing). :wink:

moo
__________________
moo (moo') adj. Of no practical importance; irrelevant, such as a moo point (i.e. a cow's opinion).
 
  • #13
moo said:
If you're not sure about selling it yet, consider loaning it to a museum or art gallery. You can always sell it later, and might even get a few offers if your name is displayed as the owner.

Plus their insurance should cover it for you in case of loss or damage (although I'd get that in writing). :wink:

That's a good idea. Smaller museums might be more interested in a loaner from a less well-known artist than a large museum that already needs to rotate their exhibits to display everything. Maybe a nearby university has an art museum and would welcome having it on loan. It would also mean it's stored or displayed under appropriate conditions to preserve it so it doesn't get damaged. You don't want to just stick it in a musty basement or hot attic if it's something worth a lot of money.

I also agree with Danger's advice to get it professionally appraised. Find out if it's really something valuable or not. I've never heard of the artist, but I'm not exactly an art buff either.

You should look up the artist and see if you find anything. The artist might be well-known in the art world, or you might find that he's really a nobody who just knew your grandfather and was giving away his paintings as gifts when they weren't selling.

Edit: I just looked up his name in a Google search. The artist is South African, and seems to be known among those interested in African art. You might want to contact the gallery in the first link about the painting.

http://www.somerseteast.co.za/ttdas.html#Walter_Battiss_Gallery

http://www.panafricanartists.org/overcomingmaps3/south_african_art_en.htm
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #14
Good idea, moo. I'd forgotten about the option of lending something to a museum or gallery... I was thinking that it had to be a donation, entailing loss of ownership (says something about how often I attend such places). The insurance aspect, and Moonbear's mention of storage conditions, make that a very practical approach.
 
  • #15
Agreed. I had only thought of storage as an inconvenience (am no art buff either), but if not done properly the painting could easily be ruined. :eek:

moo
__________________
moo (moo') adj. Of no practical importance; irrelevant, such as a moo point (i.e. a cow's opinion).
 
  • #16
Wow thanks guys. [I had a suspsion that he was south african (because my family and I are South africans)] I will discuss some of your ideas with the family and let you know what we decide
 
  • #17
moo said:
Agreed. I had only thought of storage as an inconvenience (am no art buff either), but if not done properly the painting could easily be ruined. :eek:
Paintings are normally kept in a climate controlled vault, otherwise they will deteriorate. If kept in moist enviroment, mold or mildew could damage or destroy it.

One could find out on-line what Battis paintings/are are worth, or one could probably find an appraiser, or contact an art museum. Perhaps a university art deparment might have someone who could give a rough assessment.

One might keep it as an investment, or sell it, or give it to a family member or friend who appreciates it. If one gives it away, chances are that at some point it would be sold anyway.
 

Related to Deciding What To Do With Inherited Nude Sketch

1. What are the ethical considerations when deciding what to do with inherited nude sketches?

When deciding what to do with inherited nude sketches, there are several ethical considerations to keep in mind. First, you should consider the wishes of the original artist. If they were alive, would they want these sketches to be publicly displayed or kept private? You should also consider the potential impact on the subjects of the sketches. Would they be comfortable with these sketches being made public? Additionally, you should consider the potential cultural or societal implications of displaying these sketches. It's important to respect the privacy and dignity of all individuals involved.

2. What are the legal implications of inheriting nude sketches?

The legal implications of inheriting nude sketches will depend on the specific circumstances of the inheritance. If the sketches were left to you in a will, you may have legal ownership and can decide what to do with them. However, if the sketches were stolen or obtained illegally, you may face legal consequences for possessing them. It's important to research and understand the legal implications before making any decisions about the sketches.

3. Should inherited nude sketches be displayed or kept private?

The decision to display or keep inherited nude sketches private ultimately depends on your personal values and the ethical considerations mentioned earlier. If you are uncomfortable with displaying these sketches, it is completely acceptable to keep them private. However, if you believe the sketches have historical or artistic value, you may choose to display them in a respectful and appropriate manner.

4. How can I ensure the privacy and respect of the subjects in the inherited nude sketches?

If you decide to display inherited nude sketches, it's important to take steps to protect the privacy and respect of the subjects. This may include obtaining written consent from the subjects or their families, blurring or obscuring certain details in the sketches, or displaying them in a private or limited-access setting. It's important to communicate openly and honestly with all parties involved to ensure their wishes and feelings are respected.

5. Is it appropriate to sell inherited nude sketches?

The decision to sell inherited nude sketches is a personal one and may depend on the specifics of the inheritance and the wishes of the original artist. If the artist explicitly stated that the sketches should not be sold, it would be unethical to do so. However, if the artist did not express any wishes or the sketches were obtained legally, it may be acceptable to sell them. It's important to carefully consider the ethical and legal implications before making a decision to sell the sketches.

Similar threads

Replies
15
Views
777
Replies
0
Views
624
  • General Discussion
Replies
24
Views
280
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
6
Views
797
  • General Discussion
Replies
26
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
734
Replies
1
Views
917
  • General Discussion
4
Replies
133
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
595
Back
Top