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Deep ocean CO2

  1. May 13, 2007 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. May 16, 2007 #2
    Andre, This seems to confirm your thought that the CO2 level in the atmosphere follows global warming cycles, and then further increases global temperature, rather than causing the warming event. Now the question is "what causes the deep ocean turn over and CO2 release?" Glacial melting into the Artic sea may be the cause. I would think that cold fresh water would be less dense than salty sea water and not cause the thermal convection current required to roll-over the deep water in the artic.
     
  4. May 16, 2007 #3
    I think that the explanation of this overturning in the eurekalert interview is baloney. Luckely it's not in the orginal article. Any oceanographers around for their opinion?

    Yes I have an idea about it. Check out the pulsating equator thread.

    Sorry I'm pushed. More later
     
  5. May 16, 2007 #4
    So what's the story? I couldn't get past the abstract to that paper, but it seemed to be about a mechanism for CO2 rise after deglaciation. Obviously people have known about the phenomenon for a while now, so what's the mechanism and what has it got to do with a pulsating equator?

    p.s. I just finished my exams, so now I have time on my hands and am able to spend a little more time looking through references.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2007
  6. May 17, 2007 #5
    Okay, I'll explain Saturday. Maxed out right now.

    Hint go to the online support data at Sciencemag, copy and paste the data of the delta 14C and you got the whole story. Striking.
     
  7. May 19, 2007 #6
  8. May 21, 2007 #7
    It seems that even the ocean burps are interpreted differently by different people. This link indicates that the discharges of CO2 from the deep oceans came about as circulation patterns changed due to ice melt and warming at the end of the last ice age.

    That sure does sound familiar.:rolleyes:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070510164044.htm

    Now if we add this to the link posted by billiards referring to the antarctic waters not absorbing CO2.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6665147.stm

    This IMO tends to make a case for current global warming.
     
  9. May 28, 2007 #8
    Edward, you know, I'm really not sure that the link I posted has anything at all to do with that paper. :redface:

    I managed to get a hold of a copy of the paper! So I will try to read it and make a more sensible post later.
     
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