Define some terms please

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This may seem obvious, but please define these for me, in as much details as possible.


What does it mean to:

"be at rest" "be still" "be stationary" "to be in motion" "to move" "to travel"

Please do so without using one of the words in another one's definition (I.e. stationary means to be at rest or to be in motion means to not be at rest)
 

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  • #2
DaveC426913
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This may seem obvious, but please define these for me, in as much details as possible.


What does it mean to:

"be at rest" "be still" "be stationary" "to be in motion" "to move" "to travel"

Please do so without using one of the words in another one's definition (I.e. stationary means to be at rest or to be in motion means to not be at rest)
To be "at rest" is synonymous with being "stationary" and it means that your distance with respect to a chosen reference point neither increases, decreases nor changes orientation over time.

To move or to travel means that your distance or orientation with respect to a chosen reference point changes over time.

The key thing to take away from this is that
- none of these terms (moving, rest, stationary) are meaningful without a chosen reference point
- the chosen reference point is arbitrarily chosen out of convenience
 
  • #3
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So for an object to be at rest or to be stationary could be looked at as being in a state of slowest possible motion (0 m/s)?

Also say teleportation is possible, then if something was teleported from point A to point B, wouldnt it have moved, but not traveled?
 
  • #4
DaveC426913
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So for an object to be at rest or to be stationary could be looked at as being in a state of slowest possible motion (0 m/s)?
No, it would be in a state of no motion.



Also say teleportation is possible, then if something was teleported from point A to point B, wouldnt it have moved, but not traveled?
Since its distance wrt to the reference point has changed, it has indeed moved and travelled.

It's just that it didn't pass through the points in between.
 
  • #5
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A state of no motion is synonymous with "least possible motion" though? Since least possible motion implies no movement which means no motion.

If I am walking from A to B then I am traveleing from A to B. If I was teleported, then i did not physically travel, but I am now in a new position so I have moved.


*I don't want to come off as me stating I'm right. I just want to clarify thoughts of mine
 
  • #6
DaveC426913
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A state of no motion is synonymous with "least possible motion" though? Since least possible motion implies no movement which means no motion.
We're getting into semantics here. The answers aren't really right or wrong - there's no real universal definition of these terms.
 
  • #7
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Ok, you have indeed helped, thank you.
 
  • #8
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heres one for you if you had a coiled spring pined to a board that lent on a uncoiled spring, uponen relese the power of that spring onto the other you would create perpetual motion no?
 
  • #9
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the moving of the springs is motion yet then energy is always stationary in one self
 
  • #10
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To clarify that, are you trying to say that the springs are in motion, but the springs' energy is "at rest?"
 
  • #11
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the answer to your question is as follows, if the energy from spring 1 is given to spring 2 has there been distance created with respect to a chosen reference point
 
  • #12
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To clarify your question the answer is no
 
  • #13
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I understand what you are saying, I don't understand the point you are trying to make.
 
  • #14
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that motion itself is motionless, only by distance with respect to a chosen reference point creates oneself
 
  • #15
DaveC426913
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I understand what you are saying, I don't understand the point you are trying to make.
ianpr is confusing the topic more than clarifying. His conundrum can be simply resolved by considering the springs as the system or just a part of a spring as the system.

The same rules still apply. If you pick a reference point, you can determine whether another point is stationary or in motion wrt it.
 
  • #16
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That was for paralell motion. Now we're talking about perpendicular motion.
 
  • #17
DaveC426913
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This may seem obvious, but please figure out these for me, in as much details as possible.
Start a new thread and ask your question.
 

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